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I'm looking for a tutorial on how to build validation service layer. I want the layer to be present inside my 'domain' assembly. At the moment I've got my domain model and (maybe not the best) generic repository implementation.

My repository implementation is next:

public sealed class Repository<T> : Interface.IRepository<T> where T : Entity<T>
{
    private ISessionFactory sessionFactory;        

    public Repository(ISessionFactory sessionFactory)
    {                      
        this.sessionFactory = sessionFactory;
    }

    public T Get(Guid id)
    {
        using(var session = this.sessionFactory.OpenSession())
        {
            return session.Get<T>(id);
        }
    }
    public IQueryable<T> Get(Expression<Func<T, Boolean>> predicate)
    {
        using(var session = this.sessionFactory.OpenSession())
        {
            return session.Query<T>().Where(predicate);
        }
    }
    public IQueryable<T> All()
    {
        using(var session = this.sessionFactory.OpenSession())
        {
            return session.Query<T>();
        }
    }
    public void Add(T entity)
    {
        // execute validation here?

        using(var session = this.sessionFactory.OpenSession())
        using(var transaction = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            session.Save(entity);
            transaction.Commit();
        }
    }
    public void Remove(T entity)
    {
        using(var session = this.sessionFactory.OpenSession())
        using(var transaction = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            session.Delete(entity);
            transaction.Commit();
        }
    }
    public void Update(T entity)
    {
        // make changes &
        // execute validation here?

        using(var session = this.sessionFactory.OpenSession())
        using(var transaction = session.BeginTransaction())
        {                
            session.Update(entity);
            transaction.Commit();
        }
    }
} 

I wanted to use FluentValidation to validate entities. As far as I understand within scope of repository there are only two places where validation should be made: when adding and updating an entity.

First I thought to put IValidator<T> as a parameter to base entity class:

public abstract class Entity<T> where T : Entity<T>
{
    // ...        
    public virtual String ValidationMessage
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    public virtual Boolean Validate(IValidator<T> validator)
    {
        try
        {
            validator.ValidateAndThrow(this as T);
            return true;
        }
        catch(ValidationException ex)
        {
            this.ValidationMessage = ex.Message;
            return false;
        }
    } 
    // ...      
} 

But it doesn't seem to be right.

How do I make this right from design point of view? Any advice or tutorial is appreciated.

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

IMHO, the problem lies much before you reach the repository. The thing is that somewhere you allowed the creation of an invalid domain object and now you need to validate it to make sure you're not persisting it unless its invariant is satisfied.

Besides the technical aspect, this has deeper implications at the conceptual level of what you’re doing. Remember that an object models an entity of the real world: does it makes sense for, say, a person to have a negative age? We'll both agree that no person exists with a negative age, thus remembering the mapping between real world and software, we get to see that no Person object should exists with a negative age because that model doesn’t have its counterpart in the world.

Coming back to your scenario, think for a moment about the repository: does it fits the responsibility of entity validation in it? That seems much more than a repository should do.

What I like to do is to validate all the arguments that make up a domain object before it gets created. In that way I make sure that, if the object was instantiated, then it must be a valid one. You can do the same whenever a message is sent to an object that will cause its state to change.

About the validation, you have some choices:

  • Pass an instance of the validation class to the constructor of the object. It doesn't feels right to have it passed around each time you need to validate it, because that would mean that potentially more than one class will have knowledge of the right IValidator<T> to use for validation.
  • Have a class in charge to build the object for you: make your constructor private, and use of static creation method to accomplish correct instantiation.

It all depends on how complex the validation needs to be. Either way, you'll want to encapsulate that decision so its not spread all over your codebase (instantiate a domain object in only one place).

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