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Suppose I have this code:

-(SomeOtherType*) getMyObject {
    SomeType someObject = [[SomeType alloc] init];
    // ... later on
    SomeOtherType toReturn = [[[someObject interiorObject] retain] autorelease];
    [someObject release];
    return toReturn;
}

The toReturn object, am I handling it correctly? I want to deliver it as an autoreleased object, but I do want to scrap someObject. Is this the pattern to transfer ownership? I've gone over it in my head and on paper, and it seems OK, but I'd rather be informed by someone more enlightened.

Edit This is a very contrived example, just to illustrate the problem at hand. someObject lives across many method calls, and in the end, I want to "dump its guts". This is NOT a Daily WTF example. Please don't ridicule me. :)

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code you have provided in your question is correct. Lets go over why. When thinking about retain/release you need to think about ownership. Objects are typically owned by another object or within some particular scope. In this case getByObject's scope. The object you want to return is the interiorObject which is owned by someObject. But you need to release someObject before you return. The proper thing to do is take ownership of the interiorObject and return an autoreleased copy. And finally release or autorelease someObject.

If ownership was not acquired to the interiorObject before the release of someObject then the interiorObject could be deallocated and we would be returning a dangling pointer. The first time someone tries to send a message to it the program would likely crash.

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Thank you! I'm finally starting to wrap my head around this. :) –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Dec 30 '11 at 21:00
    
I also recommend: developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/…. It has useful information on how to write the code correctly and how to debug issues you are likely to encounter. –  Evan Dec 30 '11 at 22:12
    
Just to make sure that I truly understood this: If I was sure that interiorObject exists after deallocating someObject, i wouldn't have retain and autorelease it, right? I might be risky but i'd actually work? –  larcus94 Dec 31 '11 at 0:02
    
@Larcus94 If the retain count is >0 the object will be alive. So if interiorObject had a retain count >=2 even after one of it's owners is dealloced it would still be alive. So yes you could write code like that. It's not risky. It's very very wrong and will fail. And it will fail in ways that are time consuming to debug. So in short. Don't do that. Take ownership of objects that you need to exist. –  Evan Dec 31 '11 at 0:07
    
Okay, thanks... –  larcus94 Dec 31 '11 at 0:08
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I'm not 100% sure you need to do the retain / autorelease dance unless your expecting another thread to potentially deallocate your object?

- (SomeOtherType *)getMyObject
{
    SomeType someObject = [[SomeType alloc] init];
    // ... later on

    SomeOtherType toReturn = [someObject interiorObject];
    [someObject release];
    return toReturn;
}

The retain / autorelease dance will guarantee that the object hangs around to the end of the runloop even if another thread releases it's retains on it.

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Isn't this guaranteed anyway as long as interiorObject returns an autoreleased object? –  larcus94 Dec 30 '11 at 15:22
    
@Larcus94 Most likely YES but it depends on how interiorObject is defined for example it could potentially be @property (nonatomic, assign) id interiorObject; –  Paul.s Dec 30 '11 at 15:25
    
interiorObject just returns a reference to an object owned by someObject. One can assume that the ref count of toReturn will be 1. Because of that, toReturn will become a dangling pointer once [someObject release] has been called (because I release the interior object in dealloc of someObject). Regardless of threading... –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Dec 30 '11 at 18:51
    
In that case then what you present is correct –  Paul.s Dec 30 '11 at 19:09
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