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I am trying to make a simple script interpreter in my application. A valid script to use in my application will be something like:

#this is a comment
*IDN? #this is a comment after a valid command
:READ? #this was also a comment after a valid command
RST
#last line was a valid comment but with no comment!

Now after loading the script content inside an array of string I want to execute each line, if it does not start with # and also ignor # in the same line if it exsist:

    foreach(var command in commands)
    {
        if(!command.StartsWith("#"))
        {
            _handle.WriteString(command);
        }
    }

My code will take care of starting comments. But how to check for inline comments?

I got this idea, Will this code be IDIOT-PROOF ?

        foreach(var command in commands)
        {
            if(!command.StartsWith("#"))
            {
                if(command.IndexOf('#') != null)
                {
                    _handle.WriteString(command.Remove(command.IndexOf('#')));
                }
            else
                _handle.WriteString(command);
            }
        }
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1  
Simple. Don't execute anything after '#'. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 30 '11 at 14:50
    
Yeah but how to find out a line has # after the command ? –  Sean87 Dec 30 '11 at 14:52
1  
I would suggest that for the time being you ignore the little difficulty that you are having with how to handle inline comments, and focus on the rest of your interpreter. By the time you have finished it, you will know how to handle inline comments. ;-D –  Mike Nakis Dec 30 '11 at 14:54
    
As @DanielMosmondor points out in his answer, the strategy depends on if and (if yes) in which context(s) a # can be something else than a comment marker. Depending on this, it can be as simple as String.IndexOf() or go up to full tokenization. –  Eugen Rieck Dec 30 '11 at 14:55
1  
Regarding your edit, I'd say Damien_The_Unbeliever's approach is preferable. Also, IndexOf checks are usually done by seeing if it's greater than -1 (which means that there's an occurrence). If it returns -1, then there are no hashes in the string. –  keyboardP Dec 30 '11 at 14:59
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rephrase your question - another way to phrase it is that you want to process the part of each line that appears before the first # sign. Which would be the first element of the array returned by String.Split:

foreach(var command in commands)
{
    var splits = command.Split('#');
    if(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(splits[0]))
    {
        _handle.WriteString(splits[0]);
    }
}

And this now deals with the # character, wherever it appears in the line.

share|improve this answer
    
Just be careful using this if your scripting language requires a concept of string literals. CMD "some#literal" #this is a comment won't be parsed correctly. –  M.Babcock Dec 30 '11 at 15:04
    
@M.Babcock - agreed, if #s are allowed to appear within commands, it all becomes much more complicated. At the moment, the above matches the OPs examples and attempts, but worth keeping the more complex possibilities in mind. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 30 '11 at 15:06
    
You got my upvote because I've taken this approach several times in the past. I've also been bitten a few times which is why I figured I'd add the disclaimer. –  M.Babcock Dec 30 '11 at 15:10
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Just get rid of everything after the #. This regex will strip off any whitespace before the comment as well. If there's anything left, it's probably a command.

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

...

command = Regex.Replace(command, @"\s*#.*$", "");
if (command != "")
{
    // this is a command, not a comment line
    // and any comment has been stripped off
}

I say "probably" because only whitespace before a # is stripped off. You might consider Trimming your string if whitespace causes problems.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Correct.. but not simple :) –  mellamokb Dec 30 '11 at 14:58
    
Eh. Simple as hell if you know regex :) –  cHao Dec 30 '11 at 15:01
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you may want to take a look at Irony. It is a framework that can be used for parsing custom made "languages" like you are trying. You will be able to define a set of commands and syntax etc. Even though it is alpha state, for you purposes it should be stable enough.

Check this Irony tutorial for creating your own domain specific language.

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