Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a for loop over an array. What I want to do is test for a certain condition in the loop and skip to the next iteration if true:

For i = LBound(Schedule, 1) To UBound(Schedule, 1)
    If (Schedule(i, 1) < ReferenceDate) Then
        PrevCouponIndex = i
        Continue   '*** THIS LINE DOESN'T COMPILE, nor does "Next"
    End If
    DF = Application.Run("SomeFunction"....)
    PV = PV + (DF * Coupon / CouponFrequency)
Next

I Know I can do:

 If (Schedule(i, 1) < ReferenceDate) Then Continue For

but I want to be able to record the last value of i in the PrevCouponIndex variable.

Any ideas?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
You said: "I Know I can do: If (Schedule(i, 1) < ReferenceDate) Then Continue For" Are you sure about that? Continue is not a VBA keyword. –  mwolfe02 Dec 30 '11 at 14:59
    
@mwolfe02 - no not sure, but saw in examples somewhere (cpearson?) –  Richard H Dec 30 '11 at 16:21
    
may have been a VB.NET example –  Anonymous Type Aug 8 '14 at 3:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Couldn't you just do something simple like this?

For i = LBound(Schedule, 1) To UBound(Schedule, 1)
  If (Schedule(i, 1) < ReferenceDate) Then
     PrevCouponIndex = i
  Else
     DF = Application.Run("SomeFunction"....)
     PV = PV + (DF * Coupon / CouponFrequency)
  End If
Next
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, is exactly what I have done :) But still it bugs me I have to wrap stuff in the Else piece. Thanks –  Richard H Dec 30 '11 at 16:22
3  
+1 @RichardH well you have to use an IF for the test so this isn't that expensive codewise. You should though ensure that the most common outcome is that Schedule(i, 1) is less than ReferenceDate to avoid executing the Elsemore often than necessary. Otherwise use (ReferenceDate>=Schedule(i, 1)). (if the test is 50/50 then no need for optimisation) –  brettdj Dec 31 '11 at 1:17

VBA does not have a Continue or any other equivalent keyword to immediately jump to the next loop iteration. I would suggest a judicious use of Goto as a workaround, especially if this is just a contrived example and your real code is more complicated:

For i = LBound(Schedule, 1) To UBound(Schedule, 1)
    If (Schedule(i, 1) < ReferenceDate) Then
        PrevCouponIndex = i
        Goto NextIteration
    End If
    DF = Application.Run("SomeFunction"....)
    PV = PV + (DF * Coupon / CouponFrequency)
    '....'
    'a whole bunch of other code you are not showing us'
    '....'
    NextIteration:
Next

If that is really all of your code, though, @rhooligan is absolutely correct. Just put an Else clause in your If statement and be done with it.

share|improve this answer
8  
Thanks, that's a good tip re the GoTo (VBA - beaming you back to 1964) –  Richard H Dec 30 '11 at 16:23
1  
@George: GoTo can be abused (which is why I qualified my statement; see judicious), but it is not inherently evil. Seriously though, it is impossible to write robust VBA without the Goto statement simply because you need it for error handling (i.e., On Error Goto). –  mwolfe02 Feb 25 at 0:55
2  
@George: What I'm recommending here is a workaround for another limitation of the language (no Continue statement). One can argue that the use of Continue in other languages should be avoided and therefore should be avoided here as well. In some ways, the link you posted makes my point. The link is to the GoTo statement in VB.Net. VB.Net has both structured error handling and Continue For/Continue Do statements. There is truly no need for GoTo in VB.Net; I suspect it was left in place largely to support easier conversion of existing VBA/VB6 code. –  mwolfe02 Feb 25 at 16:39
2  
@George GoTo has the benefit of reducing nesting. Skipping a loop iteration without adding a level of indentation is, IMO, one of the few legit uses of GoTo in VBA/VB6. Especially if you extract the loop's body into its own procedure‌​. –  Mat's Mug Mar 3 at 16:56
2  
@George I've seen nesting that doesn't break code, but wrecks one's brain ;) –  Mat's Mug Mar 3 at 17:40

Continue For isn't valid in VBA or VB6.

From this MSDN page it looks to have been introduced into VB.Net in VS 2005./Net 2.

As the others have said there's not really an option other than to use Goto or an Else.

share|improve this answer

You could just manipulate the for loop counter:

For i = LBound(Schedule, 1) To UBound(Schedule, 1)
    If (Schedule(i, 1) < ReferenceDate) Then
        PrevCouponIndex = i
        i = i + 1
    End If
    DF = Application.Run("SomeFunction"....)
    PV = PV + (DF * Coupon / CouponFrequency)
Next

Warning: i could end up > UBound if the last iteration triggers the If...

share|improve this answer
    
I have used this method and had issues with the counter not being a variable that can be manipulated. I am not sure I if I had another error, but I think everything was in order and the manipulation was just voided once the Next command was encountered. –  Reverend_Dude Jun 13 '14 at 19:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.