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i erase elements from middle of my deque frequently. memory address of elements in deque are used in some other places. does erasing middle element from deque invalided all pointers to deque like it does with vectors? should i switch to list?(i iterate whole deque anyways)

i tried to read deque implementation but it is complex, i don't understand if it acts as a list or vector.

I'm using visualc++ std implementation of deque.

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2 Answers 2

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Yes. An insertion in the middle invalidates all iterators and references to elements (and thus pointers to elements). An insertion at either end invalidates all iterators, but not references or pointers. And you don't read the implementation to find out such things; you read the documentation. (The implementation may actually allow operations which aren't officially supported. Until the next bug fix.)

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then i'll switch to std::list. does list have any issues with erasing from middle? i just wanna be sure, it's gonna take at some time to switch. i have a lot of [] and .at() calls. –  mikbal Dec 30 '11 at 15:40
    
@mikbal: List is safer and guards you against iterator invalidation but selecting a Standard library container really depends on type of data you want to store and operations you want to perform on the data. –  Alok Save Dec 30 '11 at 15:42
    
i iterate all elements. it's o(n) for all but i kinda dont like list because it's somehow very slow compared to deque and vector in practice. it seems list my destiny though. –  mikbal Dec 30 '11 at 15:48
    
@mikbal std::list is the only standard container which guarantees iterators, references and pointers, no matter what (unless you erase the element under the iterator). On the other hand, it's O(n) for random access (rather than O(1)), and it is a lot slower than the other containers, because each element is allocated separately---lot's of allocation and deallocation, and very poor locality. –  James Kanze Dec 30 '11 at 16:21

does erasing middle element from deque invalided all pointers to deque like it does with vectors?

In case of a deque all iterators and references to the deque are invalidated, unless the erased members are at an end (front or back) of the deque.

For a vector all iterators and references before the point of insertion are unaffected, unless the new container size is greater than the previous capacity.

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