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In a PHP project I have some data I want to sort using a linear time, simple counting sort:

$ar = array(7, 2, 0, 3, 8, 0, 12, 7, 6, 7);
$count = array();
foreach ($ar as $v)
    $count[$v]++;
$sorted = array();    
foreach ($count as $v => $c)
    for ($i = 0; $i < $c; $i++)
        $sorted[] = $v;

The problem is that the above obviously doesn't work. The php array works more like a hashmap than an array. The code can be made to work by inserting ksort($count) before the final loop, but ksort runs in O(nlogn) which destroys the entire point.

Is there any way to do a linear time sort in php? Perhaps using some paramter to array(), or some entirely different structure?

share|improve this question
2  
Are you trying to sort the array based on how many times an item occurs in that array? So in your above example "7" would be first because it occurs more (3) times than any other number? –  Matt Moore Dec 30 '11 at 16:21
    
The above is supposed to leave $sorted as a sorted version of $ar. That is array(0,0,2,3,6,7,7,7,8,12). Currently it gives array(7,7,7,2,0,0,3,8,12,6). –  Thomas Ahle Dec 30 '11 at 16:29
1  
So speed is not an issue, but it needs to run linear? –  hakre Dec 30 '11 at 17:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You didn't follow the algorithm correctly. This is O(n).

$ar = array(7, 2, 0, 3, 8, 0, 12, 7, 6, 7);
$count = array();
foreach ($ar as $v) {
    $count[$v] = isset($count[$v]) ? $count[$v] + 1 : 1;
}
$sorted = array();
$min = min($ar);
$max = max($ar);
for ($i=$min; $i<$max; $i++) {
    if (isset($count[$i])) {
        for ($j=0; $j<$count[$i]; $j++) {
            $sorted[] = $i;
        }
    }
}

also, see array_count_values(), or alternatively compute the min and max inside the counting loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah right. Lovely. Though a bit ugly with the isset test? –  Thomas Ahle Dec 30 '11 at 17:07
    
What about the second one, can you make an array default to 0? –  Thomas Ahle Dec 30 '11 at 17:20
1  
you can use array_fill(), but that creates real entries in the array. array_fill and array_merge could replace the inner most for loop though, I just didn't want to get fancy. –  goat Dec 30 '11 at 17:25
    
@ThomasAhle: Drop that function, even if it's O(n), it's much more slower than PHP's interal sort(). You're comparing complexity at the wrong place. –  hakre Dec 30 '11 at 17:38

If i understand your question AND comment correctly, just using sort($count) would work no?

$ar = array(7, 2, 0, 3, 8, 0, 12, 7, 6, 7);
$sorted = $ar;
sort($sorted);
var_dump($ar);
var_dump($sorted);

Result:

array(7,2,0,3,8,0,12,7,6,7);
array(0,0,2,3,6,7,7,7,8,12);

But i'm wondering what the foreach($ar as $v)$count[$v]++; does... doesn't really make sense...

share|improve this answer
    
The question is called "Counting sort" because I'm looking to implement a counting sort. Counting sort has the advantage of running in O(n+k) where k is the size of the largest element. sort() runs in O(nlogn). –  Thomas Ahle Dec 30 '11 at 16:58
    
Still, the result is the same no? Quicksort is slow if you have thousands of elements, but PHP is usually not meant to process that kind of information. You use MySQL do to so. So what is the means of the question in the end if i might ask? –  Mathieu Dumoulin Dec 30 '11 at 17:07
    
Teaching the quirks of php I guess :) And in the case where you have data well suited for counting sort anyway. –  Thomas Ahle Dec 30 '11 at 17:09

Adding some comments to the code to show you why this doesn't do what you think it should do.

$ar = array(7, 2, 0, 3, 8, 0, 12, 7, 6, 7);

$count = array();
foreach ($ar as $v) {
    // add each number in $ar to $count.
    // the first number in $ar is 7, so 7 will be the first number in $count.
    // because 7 is in $ar 3 times, $count[7] == 3.
    $count[$v]++;
}

// the output of print_r will be very revealing:
print_r($count);
/*Array
(
    [7] => 3
    [2] => 1
    [0] => 2
    [3] => 1
    [8] => 1
    [12] => 1
    [6] => 1
)*/

$sorted = array();    
foreach ($count as $v => $c) {
    // the first entry: $count[7] == 3
    // so add 7 to $sorted 3 times.
    // the second entry: $count[2] == 1
    // so add 2 to $sorted 1 time.
    // etc.
    for ($i = 0; $i < $c; $i++) {
        $sorted[] = $v;
    }
}

This simply groups numbers together based on their location in the first array.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but as I wrote in the question, the code "obviously doesn't work". I just wanted to show you the algorithm you would use in C or Java. I hoped somebody could tell me a way to make it work in php (in the proposed complexity). –  Thomas Ahle Dec 30 '11 at 17:02

To get the sorted $ar in a variable of it's own ($sorted), it's pretty trivial:

$sorted = $ar;
sort($sorted);

Which makes me think that your question and comment is not giving the whole picture.

Edit: Now after you have clarified that you wanted to implement a specific algorithm (and you actually got an answer already that shows some points that were wrong implementing it first), I think it's worth to focus on another aspect of your question:

You're comparing the complexity of two (theoretical) algorithms, but you're leaving aside how the algorithms are implemented.

PHP's sort() - even based on "bad" quicksort, will outrun your own PHP usercode implementation of some other algorithm by numbers.

You just have compared the wrong parameters here. The complexity of a function does not says much when you compare a build-in PHP function with some function in your user-code.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah had the same bogus running... Question is either not clear or problem is overly simple... –  Mathieu Dumoulin Dec 30 '11 at 16:49
    
The PHP sort is a quicksort, see: php.net/manual/en/function.sort.php That means in runs worst case O(n^2) and O(nlogn) in average. –  Thomas Ahle Dec 30 '11 at 16:56
    
There are other sort algorithms, which one would you prefer if you think quicksort is too slow? –  hakre Dec 30 '11 at 17:00
    
@hakre: Counting sort obviously ;) –  Thomas Ahle Dec 30 '11 at 17:06
    
@ThomasAhle: Edited the answer, the complexity you talk about are two pair of shoes. You can't compare those two functions which each other unless you metric in your specific case. –  hakre Dec 30 '11 at 17:35

Approved answer is wrong. Correct:

$ar = array(7, 2, 0, 3, 8, 0, 12, 7, 6, 7);
$count = array();
foreach ($ar as $v) {
    $count[$v] = isset($count[$v]) ? $count[$v] + 1 : 1;
}
$sorted = array();
$min = min($ar);
$max = max($ar);
for ($i=$min; $i  <=   $max; $i++) {
    if (isset($count[$i])) {
        for ($j=0; $j<$count[$i]; $j++) {
            $sorted[] = $i;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Could you add some explanation as to why it is wrong? –  Origin Dec 7 '12 at 10:01
    
Yes, from a quick comparison, I can see no difference. –  Ren Dec 7 '12 at 10:02
    
Is it wrong because of style or wrong as in just wrong... why would it get approved if it were wrong? –  aug Dec 7 '12 at 10:03

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