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In Linux x86-64 environment, is the entire process allocated on virtual memory pages? By entire process i mean the text, data, bss, heap and stack?

Also, when libc calls Brk, does the kernel returns memory that is managed via pages by virtual memory manager ?

Lastly, can a process get memory on heap, which is not managed by virtual memory manager, in other words, can a process get access to physical memory?

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A process has one or more tasks (scheduled by the kernel) which for a multi-threaded process are the processes' threads (and for a non-threaded process the task running the process), and it has an address space (and some other resources, e.g. opened file descriptors).

Of course, the address space is in virtual memory. The kernel is allowed to swap pages (to e.g. the swap zone of your disk). It tries hard to avoid doing that (swapping pages to disk is very slow, because the disk access time is in dozens of milliseconds, while the RAM access time is in tenth of microsecond).

text & bss etc are virtual memory segments, which are memory mappings. You can think of a process space as a memory map. The mmap(2) system call is the way to modify it. When an executable is started with execve system call, the kernel establish a few mappings (e.g for text, data, bss, stack, ...). The sbrk(2) system call also change it. Most malloc implementations use mmap (at least for big enough zones) and sometimes sbrk.

You can avoid that a memory range is swapped out by locking it into RAM using the mlock(2) syscall, which usually requires root privilege. It is rarely useful in practice (unless you code real-time applications). There is also the msync syscall (to flush memory to disk), you can of course map a portion of file into virtual memory (using mmap), you can change the protection with mprotect(2), remove map with munmap(2), extend a mapping with mremap -a Linux specific syscall-, and you could even catch the SIGSEGV signal and handle it (often in a machine specific way). The madvise(2) syscall enables you to tune paging with hints.

You can understand the memory map of a process of pid 1234 by reading the /proc/1234/maps file (or also /proc/1234/smaps). (From inside an application, you can use /proc/self/ instead of /proc/1234/ ...) I suggest you to run in a terminal:

cat /proc/self/maps

which will show you the memory map of the process running that cat command. You can also use the pmap utility.

Most recent linux kernels provide Adress Space Layout Randomization (so two similar processes running the same program on the same input have different mmap-ed & malloc-ed addresses). You could disable it thru /proc/sys/kernel/randomize_va_space

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Except in very rare circumstances (uClinux), processes only see virtual memory, which is mapped to physical memory by the kernel.

The kernel can be asked to make specific mappings that give a predictable physical address for a given virtual address; you need the appropriate capability to do that however, as this breaks down the process separation.

On execve, the current mappings are replaced by the loadable segments from the ELF file specified; these are mapped so that referenced pages are loaded from the ELF file (some initial readahead is also performed). The brk system call mainly extends the non-executable mapping with the highest addresses (excluding the stack mapping) by a few pages, allowing the process to access more virtual addresses without being sent a SIGSEGV.

The heap is generally managed by the process internally, but the virtual address space assigned to heap objects must be known to the virtual memory manager beforehand in order to create a mapping. malloc will generally look into its internal tables for a region that is already mapped and usable, and if none can be found, use either brk() or mmap() to create more mappings.

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In Linux x86-64 environment, is the entire process allocated on virtual memory pages?

Yes, all processes have a virtual address space, i.e. have their own page table and virtual memory to physical memory mapping pattern.

Also, when libc calls Brk, does the kernel returns memory that is managed via pages by virtual memory manager ?

Yes, in fact, if you aren't hacking the OS kernel, virtual memory is transparent to you.

can a process get memory on heap, which is not managed by virtual memory manager, in other words, can a process get access to physical memory?

No, you can't manage physical memory per my knowledge unless you run your program without support from OS. Because process has its own virtual space, all your action related to memory management is on virtual memory.

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