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I am trying to pass a link that contains variables to a mailer model. For such a simple email, I'd rather not use liquid.

controller:

...
@token = @user.authentication_token
link = "<a href='http://www.mysite.com/?token=<%= @token %>' >Click here</a>"
UserMailer.deliver_reminder(@user, @link)

model:

def reminder(user, link)
    recipients user.email
    from "service@mysite.com"
    subject "link"
    body "Go here: " + link
end

here's the way the link gets sent in the email:

<a href='https://www.mysite.com/?token=<%= @token %>' >Click here</a>

thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using regular string interpolation:

link = "<a href='http://www.mysite.com/?token=#{@token}'>Click here</a>"

Using string concatenation:

link = "<a href='http://www.mysite.com/?token=" + @token + "'>Click here</a>"
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for trying. thanks. but i get <a href='mysite.com/?token=oj6...'; >Click here</a> in the email then. –  Jay Dec 30 '11 at 16:24
    
Did you perhaps copy it down wrong? It's just that my solution doesn't contain a semicolon. –  sczizzo Dec 30 '11 at 16:27
    
tried your second solution and get the same result –  Jay Dec 30 '11 at 16:33
    
nope... tried both solutions exactly... triple checked syntax on each. I could eliminate the link syntax and use an ugly link that would result in an ugly link that looks like mysite.com/?token=oj6... instead of a nice clean "click here". –  Jay Dec 30 '11 at 16:34
    
Maybe your @token variable, then? I tried it with a local variable: token = 'ASDF' ; link = "<a href='http://www.mysite.com/?token=#{token}'>Click here</a>". Inspecting link yields "<a href='http://www.mysite.com/?token=ASDF'>Click here</a>", as expected. –  sczizzo Dec 30 '11 at 16:37

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