Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an html file that uses the span keyword in two different ways.

The first being in the second definition button.groovyButton span here:

button.groovyButton {
    border: 0;
    padding: 0;
    height: 45px;
    background:  url('../images/leftside.png') no-repeat;
}

button.groovyButton span {
    font-size: 22px;
    font-family: "san-serif";
    font-weight:bold; 
    color: #FF9900;
    line-height: 45px;
    background: url('../images/mainbak.png') no-repeat right;
    position: relative;
    left: 5px;
    display: block;
    white-space: nowrap;
    padding-right: 50px;
}

and the second, where the button.groovyButton style is used in the html:

...
<body>
<div style="text-align: center;">
  <button value="Submit" type="submit" class="groovyButton">
  <span>Please wait<img src="/images/blah.gif" width="24" height="39" /></span>
  </button>
</div>

I see how the <span></span> is used to group elements together, but what about the button.groovyButton span?

share|improve this question
1  
So you can have multiple buttons with the same style without copying the code –  craig1231 Dec 30 '11 at 16:36
    
@craig1231, but wouldn't just class="groovyButton" do that? –  BeeBand Dec 30 '11 at 16:37
    
I'm not sure what you're asking. You have a selector that includes span, ie, button.groovyButton span, and you have a physical <span> element on the page. Are you asking what the difference is between these two? –  Jared Farrish Dec 30 '11 at 16:38
2  
@BeeBand You need to review the basics of CSS syntax –  Lucifer Sam Dec 30 '11 at 16:39
2  
Read the CSS specs on selectors: w3.org/TR/CSS2/selector.html They are different in that a <span> is a physical element in the markup, and .groovyElement span selects physical elements and applies styles to them. –  Jared Farrish Dec 30 '11 at 16:48
show 7 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Basically it's saying that all instances of that are used inside the class button.groovyButton will get the same styling unless another class is set on the span.

Examples:

<body>
  <div style="text-align: center;">
    <button value="Submit" type="submit" class="groovyButton">
      <span>Span 1</span>
      <span>Span 2</span>
    </button>
    <span>Span 3</span>
</div>

So in that example Spans 1 and 2 will get the styling

button.groovyButton span {
      font-size: 22px;
      font-family: "san-serif";
      font-weight:bold; 
      color: #FF9900;
      line-height: 45px;
      background: url('../images/mainbak.png') no-repeat right;
      position: relative;
      left: 5px;
      display: block;
      white-space: nowrap;
      padding-right: 50px;
    }

but span 3 will not get that styling.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, v. clear answer. –  BeeBand Dec 30 '11 at 16:55
add comment

The first instance is within a css selector, defining a group of css styles. These styles will be applied to any span that's contained within a button with a class of "groovyButton".

Your second instance is the actual HTML of the page, where the above styles will apply. The button tag has been given the groovyButton class, so the first batch of css will apply here. Within the button you have a span tag, which the second batch of css will apply to.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's not a difference, one is affected by the other. The <span> element is styled using the styles defined within this CSS selector: button.groovyButton span

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - succinct way of describing the concept. –  BeeBand Jan 4 '12 at 16:22
add comment

I think what you are referring to is the CSS vs HTML and how they relate? The span in your CSS is referring to the selection:

button.groovyButton span {...}

This means that the declarations you are applying to button.groovyButton span affect only the span tag(s) inside button.groovyButton. Any span tags outside of button.groovyButton will not be affected by the CSS declarations.

As for the HTML, <span>content</span>, this is what the CSS is selecting. It is a non-block element, and typically used for selection purposes, so that you may apply additional styling. There are other reasons for using spans, but in this case, that is most common use. This way you can assign additional padding, margin, line-height, color, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
By the way, you can make the span function like a div by assigning the following CSS to button.groovyButton span: display: block; Also, what is even better is that you can assign an ID to each span, or classes. Whatever you wish. This will allow for even more refinement in styling, say if you have 2, 3, or even more spans within the button tag. –  ScriptsConnect Dec 30 '11 at 16:42
add comment

This is to giver the span inside the button a special style because i can see that the span that is inside the button have a special style

share|improve this answer
add comment

SPAN is an HTML element that displays inline (it won't make a line break like a DIV does).

button.groovyelement span is a CSS Selector that will apply the styles to SPAN elements that are children of buttons of the class groovyelement:

<span>Hello</span> - Doesn't get styled

<button><span>Hello</span><button> - Doesn't get styled

<button class='groovyelement'><span>Style me!</span></button> - Gets styled

share|improve this answer
    
No, that's not right. groovyelement span in your example will instead look for an element with a class="groovyelement" that has a descendent span, not is of class groovyelement. –  Jared Farrish Dec 30 '11 at 16:42
    
i think your making things even more confusing, you may want to correct your last line of code... –  ptriek Dec 30 '11 at 16:43
    
@JaredFarrish: My initial answer was wrong, yes - I was too quick to type and my thoughts jumbled up a bit. This should be right though –  josh.trow Dec 30 '11 at 16:43
    
It's important when dealing with CSS to identify that whitespace is a selector itself. (And I didn't downvote you, btw.) –  Jared Farrish Dec 30 '11 at 16:47
    
@josh.trow, thanks. wow you edited this really quickly - would you mind posting the original code you wrote, so that JaredFarrish's comment makes sense? –  BeeBand Dec 30 '11 at 16:48
show 5 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.