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I found a question somewhere ... here it is and its answer with explanation.

main()
{
char *p="hai friends",*p1;
p1=p;
while(*p!='\0') ++*p++;
printf("%s   %s",p,p1);
}

 Answer:
 ibj!gsjfoet

 Explanation:
++*p++ will be parse in the given order

*p that is value at the location currently pointed by p will be taken

++*p the retrieved value will be incremented

when ; is encountered the location will be incremented that is p++ will be executed

Hence, in the while loop initial value pointed by p is ‘h’, which is changed to ‘i’ by executing ++*p and pointer moves to point, ‘a’ which is similarly changed to ‘b’ and so on. Similarly blank space is converted to ‘!’. Thus, we obtain value in p becomes “ibj!gsjfoet” and since p reaches ‘\0’ and p1 points to p thus p1 doesnot print anything.

I found something wrong with explanation on p1.I think p1 should print "hai friends" and output of p is fine as given.

but when I tried to run the same code on gcc compiler,its giving segmentatiion fault

here is the exact code which I tried to run ..

 #include<stdio.h>
 int main()
 {
 char *p="hai friends",*p1;
 p1=p;
 while(*p !='\0') ++*p++;
 printf("%s   %s",p,p1);
 return 0;
 }

If possible edit the title ,I could not find a suitable title which would explain the situation more clearly.

EDIT :

I tried to run the modified code as suggested by Mysticial ,But what I think output should be -

ibj!gsjfoet    hai friends

because I am incrementing only p0 but p1 should be as its initial place i.e. at the starting address of string.Please if anyone could explain it where I am getting it wrong ???

share|improve this question
1  
This must be a duplicate. To lazy to search for it though. –  Tom Dec 30 '11 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well for one, code like this: ++*p++ should be avoided because it's generally hard to read.

Secondly, the problem is that you are modifying a string literal. That's undefined behavior. Don't do it.

Instead, change your declaration to this:

char p[] = "hai friends";
char *p1;

and modify you code as such:

int main()
{

    char p[] = "hai friends";
    char *p0,*p1;
    p0 = p;
    p1 = p;
    while(*p0 !='\0') ++*p0++;
    printf("%s   %s",p0,p1);
    return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks ... but if possible can you explain it a bit more.. I mean how is it working ??? It is not allowing me to change the string if I have declared it as pointer to char but I can do that if I am making it as a array of characetrs. Secondly I tried to use it as you said but again one error lvalue rquired.Thanx in advance !! –  Udit Gupta Dec 30 '11 at 17:55
    
is this code compiler dependent ?? –  Udit Gupta Dec 30 '11 at 17:56
1  
The reason is that a string literal declared as char *p = "blah" is stored in static memory and is not allowed to be modified. However, when it is declared as char p[] = "blah", it is shorthand for char p[] = {'b', 'l', 'a', 'h', '\0'}; which is an array on the stack and can be modified. –  Mysticial Dec 30 '11 at 17:59
    
thanx again ... please if possible have a look at my edit so that I can clear where I am wrong and close the thread. –  Udit Gupta Dec 30 '11 at 18:17
1  
Ah, I just tried and I see the problem. p1 is in fact being printed out as ibj!gsjfoet. It's p0 that's not being printed. That's because after your loop, p0 points to the end of the string. The first character is \0. So it's effectively an empty string. –  Mysticial Dec 30 '11 at 18:33

"hai friends" is a literal string that can't be modified.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not true since the example program does indeed modify the string. Mystical is correct in that it is undefined behaviour. In this case, the values are incremented, but on other systems the behaviour could be different. If the data is in ROM then the values won't change, the hardware might generate an interrupt if ROM is written to. The OS might put the data into a read-only segment of RAM (which, IIRC, can be done in ia32 code) and generate a run-time error when the data is written to. Or something else entirely. –  Skizz Dec 30 '11 at 18:01
2  
In this context, the meaning of "can't" is "isn't permitted". –  Michael Burr Dec 30 '11 at 18:12

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