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I need to make to following snippet of code work in the context of an open file. This code needs to run in an Excel add-in to write the currently open document to a database. At line 3, System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes() an error occurs indicating that the document is currently in use. Is there an equivalent method that I can use that will work on an open document? If not, what is the solution?

Foo.DataClasses1DataContext db = new Foo.DataClasses1DataContext();
string ThisDocument = Globals.ThisAddIn.Application.ActiveWorkbook.FullName;
byte[] inputBuffer = System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes(ThisDocument);
Foo.RFP_Document rfpDocument = new Foo.RFP_Document();
rfpDocument.DocumentName = "Some Name";
rfpDocument.DocumentFile = new System.Data.Linq.Binary(inputBuffer);
db.RFP_Documents.InsertOnSubmit(rfpDocument);
db.SubmitChanges();

Here's a link to a similar question related to VB. How do I copy an open file in VB6?

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I would generally avoid storing whole files in the database, especially if they are large. Why not store the files as files in a specific folder, and then (from the database) point to that filepath? –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Dec 30 '11 at 18:11
    
I generally do that as well. However in this case I know that the files will always be small, <1mb. And I want the content of each document to be searchable. –  hughesdan Dec 30 '11 at 19:08
    
I would still claim that 1 megabyte is too large. Afterall, that's approximately 1.000.000 characters (bytes) in UTF8 encoding. Why not just search through the files themselves? –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Dec 31 '11 at 12:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could just save a copy of the file using Workbook.SaveCopyAs, use this one and delete it afterwards.

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