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I have a class that stores information about a week:

from django.db import models

#A django model, so can't subclass list (at least not easily)
class MyWeek(models.Model):
    sunday    = "foo"
    monday    = "foo"
    tuesday   = "foo"
    wednesday = "foo"
    thursday  = "foo"
    friday    = "foo"
    saturday  = "foo"

I'd like to be able to access these attributes as if the class was a list:

aweek = Myweek()

#I want this
aweek[0] = "bar"
myvar = aweek[1]

#To be shorthand for this
aweek.monday = "bar"
myvar = aweek.tuesday

#and of course
aweek[7]
ValueError/IndexError: Week indexes monday to 0 and sunday to 6, there is no 7

Everything about python makes think this is possible and easy, if only I know the right set of things to overload.

I've thought of @property, but that doesn't help so much because I want to be able to use a variable to access it:

#I want to be able to do this
aweek[somevar] = "bar"

#and via property, i'd have to use exec
#and this is just ugly and scary from an "oh god, what could somevar be" perspective
exec("aweek.%s = 'bar'" % somevar)

#Or, as kojiro pointed out below, it could be done like this:
setattr(aweek, "somevar", "bar")

Thanks.

Edit: Working code, hattip to kojiro for helping with the right methods to overload:

# overload []
def __getitem__(self, index):       
    index = int(index) #will raise value error if uncoercable, this is desired behavior
    if index < 0 or index > 6:
        raise ValueError("Requires an integer index between 0 and 6, monday is 0 sunday is 6")
    if index == 0:
        return self.monday
    elif index == 1:
        return self.tuesday
    elif index == 2:
        return self.wednesday
    elif index == 3:
        return self.thursday
    elif index == 4:
        return self.friday
    elif index == 5:
        return self.saturday
    elif index == 6:
        return self.sunday   

# overload set []
def __setitem__(self, index, item):
    index = int(index) #will raise value error if uncoercable, this is desired behavior
    if index < 0 or index > 6:
        raise ValueError("Requires an integer index between 0 and 6, monday is 0 sunday is 6")
    if index == 0:
        self.monday = item
        return
    elif index == 1:
        self.tuesday = item
        return
    elif index == 2:
        self.wednesday = item
        return
    elif index == 3:
        self.thursday = item
        return
    elif index == 4:
        self.friday = item
        return
    elif index == 5:
        self.saturday = item
        return
    elif index == 6:
        self.sunday = item
        return
share|improve this question
3  
By the way, you don't have to use exec() for the above. setattr(aweek, "somevar", "bar") will work just fine and is definitely preferable. Read more –  kojiro Dec 30 '11 at 19:12
    
oh, nice. I hadn't used setattr before, that's a much much better way of doing it, I'm going to use that in the future. –  Ted Dec 30 '11 at 19:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To create a list-like object in python you need to create the following methods:

__len__, __getitem__, __setitem__, __delitem__, __iter__, and __contains__

Link to explanatory example.

share|improve this answer
    
awesome, thanks, I suspected it was easy. –  Ted Dec 30 '11 at 19:11
1  
Or you could just inherit a class from list and override some fields from above. –  Pavel Shvedov Dec 30 '11 at 19:19
    
@PavelShvedov good point, I should've said "you need…the following". You don't have to create them if you already have them. :) –  kojiro Dec 30 '11 at 19:21
    
@PavelShvedov. subclassing list was my first instinct. But, it is either impossible or not straight forward and error prone to inherit from list -- this is a django model class, so it HAS to inherit from models.Model. Dual inheritance MIGHT be possible, but that's asking for logical rats-nests in the best case. –  Ted Dec 30 '11 at 19:22
1  
@Ted dual inheritance is possible, and to understand the logical rat's nest you need to understand The Python MRO. –  kojiro Dec 30 '11 at 19:34

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