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I have table that has a column that may have same values in a burst. Like this:

+----+---------+
| id |   Col1  | 
+----+---------+
| 1  | 6050000 |
+----+---------+
| 2  | 6050000 |
+----+---------+
| 3  | 6050000 |
+----+---------+
| 4  | 6060000 |
+----+---------+
| 5  | 6060000 |
+----+---------+
| 6  | 6060000 |
+----+---------+
| 7  | 6060000 |
+----+---------+
| 8  | 6060000 |
+----+---------+
| 9  | 6050000 |
+----+---------+
| 10 | 6000000 |
+----+---------+
| 11 | 6000000 |
+----+---------+

Now I want to prune rows where the value of Col1 is repeated and only select the first occurrence.
For the above table the result should be:

+----+---------+
| id |   Col1  | 
+----+---------+
| 1  | 6050000 |
+----+---------+
| 4  | 6060000 |
+----+---------+
| 9  | 6050000 |
+----+---------+
| 10 | 6000000 |
+----+---------+

How can I do this in SQL?
Note that only burst rows should be removed and values can be repeated in non-burst rows! id=1 & id=9 are repeated in sample result.

EDIT:
I achieved it using this:

select id,col1 from data as d1
where not exists (
    Select id from data as d2
    where d2.id=d1.id-1 and d1.col1=d2.col1 order by id limit 1)

But this only works when ids are sequential. With gaps between ids (deleted ones) the query breaks. How can I fix this?

share|improve this question
    
Is id guaranteed to be sequential (without gaps or duplicates)? –  Andriy M Dec 30 '11 at 20:17
    
@AndriyM: Yes, it is –  4r1y4n Dec 30 '11 at 20:21
    
So you use SQlite and MS Access and cannot use window functions like row_number(), right? –  Erwin Brandstetter Dec 30 '11 at 21:12
    
@ErwinBrandstetter: Yes i'm using SQlite & MS Access & as I searched they didn't support LAG & LEAD and i didn't found any window functions like row_numbers. –  4r1y4n Dec 30 '11 at 21:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a EXISTS semi-join to identify candidates:

Select wanted rows:

SELECT * FROM tbl
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM tbl t
    WHERE t.col1 = tbl.col1
    AND t.id = tbl.id - 1
    )
ORDER BY id

Get rid of unwanted rows:

DELETE FROM tbl
-- SELECT * FROM tbl
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM   tbl t
    WHERE  t.col1 = tbl.col1
    AND    t.id   = tbl.id - 1
    )

This effectively deletes every row, where the preceding row has the same value in col1, thereby arriving at your set goal: only the first row of every burst survives.

I left the commented SELECT statement because you should always check what is going to be deleted before you do the deed.


Solution for non-sequential IDs:

If your RDBMS supports the CTE and window functions (like PostgreSQL, Oracle, SQL Server, ... but not SQLite, MS Access or MySQL), there is an elegant way:

WITH x AS (
    SELECT *, row_number() OVER (ORDER BY id) AS rn
    FROM tbl
    )
SELECT id, col1
FROM   x
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM   x x1
    WHERE  x1.col1 = x.col1
    AND    x1.rn   = x.rn - 1
    )
ORDER BY id;

There is also the not-so-elegant way that does the job without those niceties.
Should work for you:

SELECT id, col1
FROM   tbl
WHERE (
    SELECT t.col1 = tbl.col1
    FROM   tbl AS t
    WHERE  t.id < tbl.id
    ORDER  BY id DESC
    LIMIT  1) IS NOT TRUE
ORDER BY id

Tool for test-casing non-sequential IDs

(Tested in PostgreSQL)

CREATE TEMP TABLE tbl (id int, col1 int);
INSERT INTO tbl VALUES
 (1,6050000),(2,6050000),(6,6050000)
,(14,6060000),(15,6060000),(16,6060000)
,(17,6060000),(18,6060000),(19,6050000)
,(20,6000000),(111,6000000);
share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanks can it be developed to cover unsequential ids? (using exists and order) –  4r1y4n Dec 30 '11 at 20:58
    
@Snigger: I guess. Please define "unsequential ids". Preferably by editing your question for everybody to read in a nice format. Ah you already did. That should do, thanks. –  Erwin Brandstetter Dec 30 '11 at 21:04
    
Thank you very much –  4r1y4n Dec 30 '11 at 21:42
    
the second query works well except that it doesn't select the first row (which is always the first occurrence) so I edited your query like this: SELECT id, col1 FROM tbl WHERE ( SELECT t.col1 = tbl.col1 FROM tbl AS t WHERE t.id < tbl.id ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1)==0 OR NOT exists(SELECT tt.id FROM tbl AS tt WHERE tt.id < tbl.id) ORDER BY id for SQlite –  4r1y4n Jan 2 '12 at 11:07
select min(id), Col1 from tableName group by Col1 
share|improve this answer
    
this removes all repeated rows but if you check my sample result you will see that id 1 and id 9 both have same values for Col1 but both are in results because there where another value (6060000 on id 4 to id 8) between them. –  4r1y4n Dec 30 '11 at 20:13

If your RDBMS supports Window Aggregate functions and/or LEAD() and LAG() functions you can leverage them to accomplish what you are trying to report. The following SQL will help get you started down the right path:

SELECT id
     , Col AS CurCol
     , MAX(Col)
       OVER(ORDER BY id ROWS BETWEEN 1 PRECEDING AND 1 PRECEDING) AS PrevCol
     , MIN(COL)
       OVER(ORDER BY id ROWS BETWEEN 1 FOLLOWING AND 1 FOLLOWING) AS NextCol
FROM MyTable

From there you can put that SQL in a derived table with some CASE logic that if the NextCol or PrevCol is the same as CurCol then set CurCol = NULL. Then you can collapse eliminate all the id records CurCol IS NULL.

If you don't have the ability to use window aggregates or LEAD/LAG functions your task is a little more complex.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Thanks but I'm using SQlite and MS Access as DBMS and they don't have this ability –  4r1y4n Dec 30 '11 at 20:35

Since id is always sequential, with no gaps or repetitions, as per your comment, you could use the following method:

SELECT t1.*
FROM atable t1
  LEFT JOIN atable t2 ON t1.id = t2.id + 1 AND t1.Col1 = t2.Col1
WHERE t2.id IS NULL

The table is (outer-)joined to itself on the condition that the left side's id is one greater than the right side's and their Col1 values are identical. In other words, the condition is ‘the previous row contains the same Col1 value as the current row’. If there's no match on the right, then the current record should be selected.


UPDATE

To account for non-sequential ids (which, however, are assumed to be unique and defining the order of changes of Col1), you could also try the following query:

SELECT t1.*
FROM atable t1
  LEFT JOIN atable t2 ON t1.id > t2.id
  LEFT JOIN atable t3 ON t1.id > t3.id AND t3.id > t2.id
WHERE t3.id IS NULL
  AND (t2.id IS NULL OR t2.Col1 <> t1.Col1)

The third self-join is there to ensure that the second one yields the row directly preceding that of t1. That is, if there's no match for t3, then either t2 contains the preceding row or it's got no match either, the latter meaning that t1's current row is the top one.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanks can it be developed to cover unsequential ids? (using exists and order) –  4r1y4n Dec 30 '11 at 20:54

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