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I am trying to chain a number of if statements using && and it doesnt seem to be working correctly. This is my code.

if ($a == "1" && $b >= "10") 
{ echo "1-3"; }
if ($a == "1" && $b <= "9")
{ echo "0-1"; }
if ($a == "2" && $b >= "10") 
{ echo "2-3"; } 
if ($a == "2" && $b <= "9")
{ echo "0-1"; }
if ($a == "3" && $b >= "10") 
{ echo "2-4"; }
if ($a == "3" && $b <= "9")
{ echo "1-2"; }
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What do you mean by doesn't work? –  Rocket Hazmat Dec 30 '11 at 20:22
    
Please specify that by does not work what do you mean, exactly? –  Milad Naseri Dec 30 '11 at 20:23
    
What are you trying to accomplish? what doesn't work? also, if $a and $b contain numeric values, try comparing them with numeric values and not strings for example, instead of: $a == "1" && $b >= "10 try $a == 1 && $b >= 10 –  Yaniro Dec 30 '11 at 20:24
    
What doesn't seem to be working properly? could you provide, actual output and expected output? –  shiplu.mokadd.im Dec 30 '11 at 20:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can compare strings, but it won't work the way you think. Comparing strings that way will only compare them based on the characters ASCII codes. (Thanks Rocket)

I assume that you want to compare the values of the numbers, therefore you should remove the quotes surround the numbers.

String: $b = "1"; Integer: $b = 1; (no quotes)

You might also want to use else if in your if statements here.

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1  
You can compare strings. It compares them based on the characters' ASCII codes. –  Rocket Hazmat Dec 30 '11 at 20:27
    
Ahh okay. But I assume that's not what he wants. –  Runar Jørgensen Dec 30 '11 at 20:29

You cannot compare a String with > or <. Leave out the " (example:

if ($a == "1" && $b >= 10) 
{ echo "1-3"; }
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4  
Actually, you can. It compares the strings based on each character's ASCII code. Which is probably why his comparisons aren't working the way he expects. –  Rocket Hazmat Dec 30 '11 at 20:24
    
@Rocket, yes that is true, but most likely not what the OP desires. –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 30 '11 at 20:25

You should take intval($a) and intval($b) if you are looking for numerical comparison.

You should compare objects in the same domain: intval($a) === 1 is strict, while intval($a) == "1" is typeless. And besides, you shouldn't compare a number to a string. As I said, both sides of the comparison should reside within the same domain.

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That won't help. When you compare a number to a string, it converts both to a string, and then compares them based on the characters' ASCII code. –  Rocket Hazmat Dec 30 '11 at 20:26
    
You should compare objects in the same domain: intval($a) === 1 is strict, while intval($a) == "1" is typeless. And besides, you shouldn't compare a number to a string. As I said, both sides of the comparison should reside within the same domain. –  Milad Naseri Dec 30 '11 at 20:30
    
I know that, you should add that to the answer though. –  Rocket Hazmat Dec 30 '11 at 20:34

The issue here is you are comparing a string to an int. When this occurs, the int is converted to a string, and then the strings are compared based on their characters' ASCII codes.

You should make sure $a and $b are ints by using intval and then compare them to ints.

$a = intval($a);
$b = intval($b);
if ($a == 1 && $b >= 10)
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