Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Lately, when using my TCP/IP Server and Client, I has noticed that they both stay open in Processes after I close them.

I fixed the Client staying open by disposing the socket to the server, which closes down all asynchronous threads in the background of my framework.

However, when trying to do so with the server, no matter what I do, the process stays open.

ASSUMING that the TCP/IP server is handling it's own stuff, is there ANY thing else in this code that would keep the process open?

EDIT: UPDATE: If I put a breakpoint after the Application.Run(new ServerForm()) line in Program.cs, it will break once I press exit or call Application.Exit().

I don't know what it is hanging up the program but it's not exiting the Main.

namespace ChatServer
{
    public partial class ServerForm : Form
    {
        private NetLib.Server _server = new NetLib.Server();
        public delegate void ClientConnection(ServerNetworkState ns);

    public ServerForm()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ServerForm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //Set up server IP and Port #.
        _server.Ip = "127.0.0.1";
        _server.Port = 5001;
        //Setup events for success/error checking
        _server.NewConnection += new NetLib.Server.NetworkStateEventHandler(_server_NewConnection);
        _server.Started += new NetLib.Server.ServerEventHandler(_server_Started);
        _server.Initialized += new NetLib.Server.ServerEventHandler(_server_Initialized);
        _server.BindFailure += new NetLib.Server.ServerEventHandler(_server_BindFailure);
        _server.BindSuccess += new NetLib.Server.ServerEventHandler(_server_BindSuccess);

        //Initialize Server and add neccesary commands
        _server.Initialize();

        //Clients will call sendmessage on the server,
        //and the server will send the message to the neccesary clients.
        _server.MessageEncoder.FriendlyCommands.Add("sendmessage", SendMessage);
    }

    public void SendMessage(short sender, short[] recipients, string text)
    {
        _server.MessagePump.Enqueue(new Packet(-1, recipients, "receivemessage", text));
    }

    void _server_BindSuccess()
    {
        //Log Bind Success at DateTime.Now
    }

    void _server_BindFailure()
    {
        //Log Bind Failure at DateTime.Now
    }

    void _server_Initialized()
    {
        //Log Initialized at DateTime.Now
    }

    void _server_Started()
    {
        //Log Started at DateTime.Now
    }

    void _server_NewConnection(NetLib.ServerNetworkState ns)
    {
        //Log New Connection with ns.Ip at DateTime.Now
        BeginInvoke(new ClientConnection(AddClientToControl), ns);            
    }

    private void AddClientToControl(NetLib.ServerNetworkState ns)
    {
        listBox1.Items.Add("ID: " + ns.Id + " IP: " + ns.Ip);
    }

    private void startServer_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _server.Start();
    }

    private void ServerForm_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
    {
        _server.Dispose();
    }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
I have no idea about NetLib.Server, but it seems that you(or your library) don't set the Thread's IsBackground property to true. –  L.B Dec 30 '11 at 20:50
    
The library doesn't use System.Threading.Thread but instead using the Socket AsyncResults. –  Kyle Uithoven Dec 30 '11 at 20:58
    
may be you should wait to see if it is disposed or not> –  Afnan Bashir Dec 30 '11 at 21:01
    
You say lately as if this wasn't happening before. Is it just that you didn't notice or is it that it wasn't actually happening before now? –  Marc Dec 30 '11 at 21:02
    
I am sure that this has been happening the entire time. –  Kyle Uithoven Dec 30 '11 at 21:03

2 Answers 2

Does NetLib.Server.Dispose() handle all of the 'shutdown' operations? Often times in the .net framework the .Close() calls the dispose but the .Dispose() does not call the close operations.

share|improve this answer
7  
It's actually the other way around; in the framework calls to Dispose() will always (as far as I am aware) call Close(), for example, calling Dispose() on a Stream. Otherwise the using construct would be useless (no pun intended...). Still a good question to ask as it was my first thought as well. –  Ed S. Dec 30 '11 at 20:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Turns out that there was one thread that was overlooked in the library. Thank you all for trying to trying to find out if there was anything above that would cause the problem.

To answer the question: Nothing in the code above was causing the issue stated. It was a thread that was opened in the Netlib library and was never handled when disposing and closing any connection that was open.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.