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if(true)
    if($i == 2)
        callMethodOne();
    elseif($i == 3)
        callMethodTwo();
    else
    {
        callMethods1();
        callMethods2();
        //so on
    }
else
    callMethodFiftyFive();      

Is it bad?

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closed as not constructive by Juhana, animuson, Stuart Golodetz, edorian, Wesley Murch Dec 30 '11 at 21:20

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It's whatever you or the company say it is. – Ash Burlaczenko Dec 30 '11 at 20:49
1  
Try it! If it works, and you can follow it, then it's good. If it looks confusing (it doesn't) or if it doesn't work (it works), then it's bad. – Dan Dec 30 '11 at 20:50
    
Bit yucky for my money :) But then it's an utterly subjective question, so there's no right answer. – Stuart Golodetz Dec 30 '11 at 20:51
1  
@Dan: it could only work if you're a lone wolf ;) – landons Dec 30 '11 at 20:52
    
Yes, it is bad. – Wesley Murch Dec 30 '11 at 21:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I wouldn't say that it is particularly bad, especially for a small, isolated script. But things like this become problems when you start working with more code, more complex code, and more importantly more programmers.

I would suggest you pick a coding standard and try to adhere to it. For example, PEAR has published their coding standard: Manual :: Coding Standards

Personally, I would at least include brackets around the first block:

if(true)
{                            // Added this
    if($i == 2)
        callMethodOne();
    elseif($i == 3)
        callMethodTwo();
    else
    {
        callMethods1();
        callMethods2();
        //so on
    }
}                            // Added this
else
    callMethodFiftyFive();

I only omit brackets for one-liners, like this:

if (foo)
    bar();

Never for anything more complicated, like:

if (foo)
    if (baz)
        spam();
    else
        eggs();

As it is very easy to forget that you've omitted the brackets, and add something inside that first "block":

if (foo)
    NewCall();
    if (baz)       // WOAH! this now happens regardless of "if (foo)"!
        spam();
    else
        eggs();
share|improve this answer

No, not really. Just be careful when omitting brackets, or you'll run into trouble when you add more lines to the if and elseif.

As always, if you are working in an environment that already has an established style, follow that first. Some groups would prefer callMethodOne() to be on the same line as the if, while others might prefer that you always use brackets. Just be consistent, and you should be fine.

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It can get annoying if you want to put a debug statement in one of those blocks. Or take one out. Or add another function call. Or remove it again. Unless you're OCD about avoiding single-line blocks, it's really not worth the trouble.

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I avoid it - the only time I don't use braces is if I have a single if and a short, single line of then results:

if (someThing) doSomethingElse();

Otherwise I always use 'em.

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What is legal for the computer is not always the most understandable code for humans.

This style is likely to lead to errors.

Consider what would happen to a braceless-if in the absence of an else (or similarly, a braceless else), with the addition of a single statement. The flow of control is not what the indentation suggests.

if(true)
    callMyOtherMethod()
    if($i == 2)
        callMethodOne();
    elseif($i == 3)
        callMethodTwo();
    else
    {
        callMethods1();
        callMethods2();
        //so on
    }
share|improve this answer

I highly suggest using brackets for every if/else statement, no matter how many lines it has. It makes it much more readable. Plus if you happen to add an extra line to the if, you'll be sure it runs when it should.

For example, what will this example do?

if(true)
    callAnotherMethod();  // Uh oh
    if($i == 2)
        callMethodOne();
        callAnotherMethodAgain();  // What's gonna happen
    elseif($i == 3)
        callMethodTwo();
    else
    {
        callMethods1();
        callMethods2();
        //so on
    }
else
    callMethodFiftyFive();
    callThisOtherMethod(); // Oh no

With brackets, it's readable, and you're 100% sure what's going on.

if(true)
{
    callAnotherMethod();  // :-)
    if($i == 2)
    {
        callMethodOne();
        callAnotherMethodAgain(); // :-)
    }
    elseif($i == 3)
    {
        callMethodTwo();
    }
    else
    {
        callMethods1();
        callMethods2();
        //so on
    }
}
else
{
    callMethodFiftyFive();
    callThisOtherMethod(); // :-)
}
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The only problem this code has is clarity. Suppose you have large no of statements inside each if and else then then tracing the code or dry running it would be harder for you as you go further from the starting if

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