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I'm trying to use quotemeta in Perl. The following is the code with the string and the pattern I am trying to find:

open FH, "<query.txt";

@foo = <FH>;
my $bar = "A lymph node Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc) Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc) metastasis 
PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp) specimen from a human testicular embryonal carcinoma with
 elements of a choriocarcinoma Secremax, SecreFlo Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp)";

foreach my $word(@foo) {
chomp $word;
if ($bar =~ /\b\Q$word\E\b/i)
{
print "$word\n";
}
}

Say, query.txt is a file that contains the following terms which I am trying to find in the string:

Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc)
Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc)
PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp)
Secremax, SecreFlo
Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp)

My code doesn't seem to work, I don't understand what is going wrong.

UPDATE:

If $bar = "A lymph node Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc) Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc) metastasis 
PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp) specimen from a human testicular embryonal carcinoma with
 elements of a choriocarcinoma Secremax, SecreFlo Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp)
specimen from a human testicular embryonal carcinoma with elements of a choriocarcinoma
was successfully  xenotransplanted into nude mice and maintained until the tenth animal
passage. Electron microscopy of the tumors in nude mice revealed details Secremax,
SecreFlo consistent with their epithelial origin.";

And the query.txt also contains the following terms:

 pa
 the
 scopy
 ealed
share|improve this question
    
What's the $sam variable that is used only once, inside the regex? Did you mean to write $word there? – jwodder Dec 30 '11 at 21:30
    
Yeah, it means $word. I edited it. – smandape Dec 30 '11 at 21:33
    
What happens when you error check your open function? – Jonathan Leffler Dec 30 '11 at 21:40
    
The file opens fine. I checked every thing. I think its regex which is causing the error. – smandape Dec 30 '11 at 21:43
    
If my updated response isn't what you want, then you should give both your sample input and explain the exact sample output you'd like to see. – cjm Dec 30 '11 at 22:09
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I added use strict; and use warnings;, inserted my before @foo, and a print statement in the loop:

foreach my $word (@foo)
{
    chomp $word;
    print "Checking $word:\n";
    if ($bar =~ /\b\Q$word\E\b/i)
    {
        print "Match $word\n";
    }
}

I then got this output from Perl 5.12.3 on MacOS X 10.7.2 (Lion):

Checking Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc):
Checking Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc):
Checking PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp):
Checking Secremax, SecreFlo:
Match Secremax, SecreFlo
Checking Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp):

So, when $word contains no regex metacharacters, the pattern match worked for me. However, it isn't as simple as 'the \Q..\E notation is not working'; I changed the query.txt file to read:

Elspar .Merck . Co. Inc.
Thyrogen .Genzyme Inc.
PEG-Intron  .Schering Corp.
Secremax, SecreFlo
Secremax, SecreFlo .Repligen Corp.

and got the same result as before. That leaves the \b notation as suspect; some of your strings do not match word boundaries. If I drop both the \b marks from the regex, then I get:

Checking Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc):
Match Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc)
Checking Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc):
Match Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc)
Checking PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp):
Match PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp)
Checking Secremax, SecreFlo:
Match Secremax, SecreFlo
Checking Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp):
Match Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp)

You could keep the first \b; that gives the same result. The close parentheses are giving problems because when followed by a space (as in the text), the do not mark the boundary between a word and a non-word.


Answer for amended question

This code seems to work as required. Basically, it looks to see how to construct the query:

use strict;
use warnings;

open FH, "<query.txt";

my @foo = <FH>;
#my $bar = "A lymph node Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc) Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc) metastasis PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp) specimen from a human testicular embryonal carcinoma with elements of a choriocarcinoma Secremax, SecreFlo Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp)";

my $bar =  "A lymph node Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc) Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc) metastasis PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp) specimen from a human testicular embryonal carcinoma with elements of a choriocarcinoma Secremax, SecreFlo Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp) specimen from a human testicular embryonal carcinoma with elements of a choriocarcinoma was successfully  xenotransplanted into nude mice and maintained until the tenth animal passage. Electron microscopy of the tumors in nude mice revealed details Secremax, SecreFlo consistent with their epithelial origin.";

foreach my $word (@foo)
{
    chomp $word;
    print "Checking $word:\n";
    my ($pfx, $sfx) = ('', '');
    $pfx = '\b' if ($word =~ /^\w/);
    $sfx = '\b' if ($word =~ /\w$/);
    if ($bar =~ /$pfx\Q$word\E$sfx/i)
    {
        print "Match $word\n";
    }
}

Sample output:

Checking Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc):
Match Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc)
Checking Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc):
Match Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc)
Checking PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp):
Match PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp)
Checking Secremax, SecreFlo:
Match Secremax, SecreFlo
Checking Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp):
Match Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp)
Checking pa:
Checking the:
Match the
Checking scopy:
Checking ealed:

That looks correct to me. Whether it works in all possible scenarios is open to discussion. You might need to worry about whether (Secremax, Secreflow (Repligen Corp)) matches the pattern with 'Repligen' in it, and if not, you have to give a very much stricter definition of what constitutes a match.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried keeping just the first \b. But if with few more words in the query.txt, it doesn't find the exact string match. It matches those words as well in substrings. Can you please refer the update of the question. – smandape Dec 30 '11 at 22:03
1  
There is seldom a perfect general regular expression for a given problem, but there usually is one that is sufficient for the problem at hand with the data at hand. That means you tune your regexes to meet your (current) requirements, rather than managing to write a single all-singing, all-dancing regex that handles every conceivable scenario. It also implies both trial-and-error development of the regex and continued monitoring of its performance on the actual data. Sometimes, it is best to have a less precise regex that misses nothing and then check/refine its results after finding a match. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 30 '11 at 22:25

The problem is the \b you've surrounded your search with. \b matches only between a \w character and a non-\w character (or at the beginning or end of the string). Since ) is not a word character, and neither is whitespace, \)\b does not match ") ".

The solution depends on exactly what you're trying to do. Maybe you wanted

$bar =~ /(?<!\w)\Q$word\E(?!\w)/i

Which says that the match must not touch a \w character on either side.

Response to Update:

Except for the, your query strings aren't words. If you want to match partial words, then you don't want \b at all. It sounds like you just mean:

$bar =~ /\Q$word\E/i

Which means "just find $word, and I don't care what's touching it."

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I think I need to modify my question a bit then. Let me add some more words that I'm looking for and the string. I want to find exact word match. – smandape Dec 30 '11 at 21:52
    
This really helps. Can you please also help me, if the case is to find the exact strings and not partial words. That is I only want to match full words and not partial words from the query.txt. How can I modify my code for regex. Thanks! – smandape Dec 30 '11 at 22:21

\b only matches at a word boundary, but some of your patterns end in a parenthesis, which is not a word boundary. Instead, use the regex /(?<!\w)\Q$word\E(?!\w)/i which ensures that your match is not preceded or followed by a word.

share|improve this answer
    
You can use \B as well. I think /\B\Q$word\E\B/i will be faster since it lacks lookarounds. – Adam Katz Feb 11 at 0:44
    
@AdamKatz How does that work when $word actually is a word? – Neil Feb 11 at 0:48
    
I have to take that back. I have no idea what the question is requesting and I accidentally read your \ws as \Ws. I suspect that the question needs refinement as nobody appears to understand what's being requested; the original $word looks to be assumed as actually parsing the variable despite the \Q︙\E disabling that. – Adam Katz Feb 11 at 5:19

use quotemeta so:

open FH, "<query.txt";

@foo = <FH>;
my $bar = "A lymph node Elspar (Merck & Co. Inc) Thyrogen (Genzyme Inc) metastasis 
PEG-Intron  (Schering Corp) specimen from a human testicular embryonal carcinoma with
 elements of a choriocarcinoma Secremax, SecreFlo Secremax, SecreFlo (Repligen Corp)";

foreach my $word(@foo) {
    chomp $word;

    my $quoted_word = quotemeta($word);

    if ($bar =~ m/$quoted_word/i){
        print "$word\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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