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I've got a very standard-fare try / catch that isn't catching a NullReferenceException. I'm trying to return a date value from a form using the .Tag property. This tag will frequently be null, which is fine. My code below seems the simplest to me but it won't catch. Any help would be great, thanks in advance...

public void ScheduleDataRun()
        {
            FrmSetTimer frmSetTimer = new FrmSetTimer(DateTimeOfNextAvailableDataRun);

            try
            {
                frmSetTimer.ShowDialog();
                DateTimeOfNextScheduledDataRun = (DateTime)frmSetTimer.Tag;
                SetDataRunTimer(DateTimeOfNextScheduledDataRun);
                Status = DRMStatus.Scheduled;
            }
            catch
            {
                Status = DRMStatus.Inactive;
                StatusChanged();
            }
        }

Edit: Issue solved per Diggingforfire suggestion below: "In the Debug->Exceptions menu you can choose to break on thrown and user-unhandled exceptions."

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7  
At any rate, throwing and catching exceptions is expensive, you'd be better served just using an if statement to check for null. Exceptions are for exceptional conditions, something that happens "frequently" isn't really "exceptional". –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Dec 30 '11 at 23:51
2  
Are you running it in a debugger? Have you perhaps turned off exceptions while debugging? –  diggingforfire Dec 30 '11 at 23:52
1  
Why do you think it doesn't catch? –  Henk Holterman Dec 30 '11 at 23:53
2  
I'm just curious why you think it's not throwing. What are you expecting? Have you set a breakpoint in the catch? In the Debug->Exceptions menu you can choose to break on thrown and user-unhandled exceptions. –  diggingforfire Dec 31 '11 at 0:02
1  
@StatsViaCsh: and when you get that runtime exception, just press F10 (Debug-Step). It should take your execution point to the catch block. –  Henk Holterman Dec 31 '11 at 0:08

5 Answers 5

This is not really answering the question, but: Causing an exception and catching it is considered bad practice when a simple if test would have sufficed. Edit: Furthermore, since the exception is apparently caused by attempting to cast null to DateTime (which is a value type, which I should have seen - thanks to the commenters, who were more awake than me), you need to check frmSetTimer.Tag before casting. Try the following:

frmSetTimer.ShowDialog();
if (frmSetTimer.Tag == null) {
   Status = DRMStatus.Inactive;
   StatusChanged();
}
else {
   SetDataRunTimer((DateTime)frmSetTimer.Tag);
   Status = DRMStatus.Scheduled;
}

This assumes that SetDataRunTimer() doesn't have any side effects that you'd want to trigger even if the argument is null. If it does, so that you have to call it whether the argument is null or not, you should modify that method to either handle null gracefully (and maybe return a bool that indicates whether things went well or not) or throws an ArgumentNullException. Also, it would need to take a DateTime? in order to make it possible to pass null at all. NullReferenceException should never be thrown by bug-free code and should not be caught explicitly - that way, any NullReferenceException is always an indication of a programming error.

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I was optimistic about that suggestion but it doesn't work... the assignment (the line before the check for null) is throwing the exception. –  StatsViaCsh Dec 31 '11 at 0:11
    
Assuming DateTimeOfNextScheduledDataRun is a value type (i.e., DateTime), would your if statement ever be true? Would not checking if frmSetTimer.Tag were null be more appropriate? –  Gayot Fow Dec 31 '11 at 1:00
    
@GarryVass: Can't believe I didn't see that - you're absolutely correct. I've updated the code. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Dec 31 '11 at 14:17
    
@StatsViaCsh: @Garry Vass saw what I should have seen immediately, namely that it is indeed the attempt to cast null to a value type that throws the exception (I had forgotten that such a cast attempt throws NullReferenceException). The updated code should work. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Dec 31 '11 at 14:19

Are you sure that there isn't a null reference exception being caused in the catch block?

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It's getting snagged here: DateTimeOfNextScheduledDataRun = (DateTime)frmSetTimer.Tag; –  StatsViaCsh Dec 31 '11 at 0:00
    
Yes, but then what happens? What is the next line of code executed? –  McKay Dec 31 '11 at 0:06

Try this:

   try
    {
        frmSetTimer.ShowDialog();
        DateTimeOfNextScheduledDataRun = (DateTime)frmSetTimer.Tag;
        SetDataRunTimer(DateTimeOfNextScheduledDataRun);
        Status = DRMStatus.Scheduled;
    }
    catch (NullReferenceException)
    {
        Status = DRMStatus.Inactive;
        StatusChanged();
    }

EDIT: If this doesn't work, try using the debugger to see if it even enters your 'catch' block in the first place.

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1  
That's just going to make the compiler complain that e is assigned but never used... –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Dec 30 '11 at 23:54
    
This didn't catch it, thanks though.. –  StatsViaCsh Dec 30 '11 at 23:55
    
@Robert If the exception isn't going to be used, you can just do a catch (NullReferenceException) to avoid the warning. –  That Chuck Guy Dec 31 '11 at 0:04
    
@Chuck That's what I was pointing out. –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Dec 31 '11 at 0:04
    
@StatsViaCsh Did you try using the debugger to see if it enters the catch block? –  Dot NET Dec 31 '11 at 0:35

Make sure that there aren't any catch blocks inside SetDataRunTimer that might "swallow" the exception. Here are some useful exceptions guidelines.

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Looking at them now, thanks.. –  StatsViaCsh Dec 31 '11 at 0:28

I'm just curious why you think it's not throwing. What are you expecting? Have you set a breakpoint in the catch? In the Debug->Exceptions menu you can choose to break on thrown and user-unhandled exceptions.

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