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Here is my query

(SELECT * FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%only three doors%" OR `joke` LIKE "%only three doors%") ORDER BY `ups` DESC,`downs` ASC)
UNION
(SELECT * FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%only%" OR `joke` LIKE "%only%") ORDER BY `ups` DESC,`downs` ASC)
UNION
(SELECT * FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%three%" OR `joke` LIKE "%three%") ORDER BY `ups` DESC,`downs` ASC)
UNION
(SELECT * FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%doors%" OR `joke` LIKE "%doors%") ORDER BY `ups` DESC,`downs` ASC)
 LIMIT 0, 30

For some reason it doesn't seem to order by ups or downs...it just tosses me back the results in the order they are naturally in the database.

When I cut it down to only one query, it works fine, but other than that, it seems to ignore it.

I also don't want to order by the entire results, or I would have put LIMIT 0,30 Order By blah

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

From MySQL documentation:

... use of ORDER BY for individual SELECT statements implies nothing about the order in which the rows appear in the final result because UNION by default produces an unordered set of rows.

Basically the only time an ORDER in a union will be useful is if you are using LIMIT as well.

So if you query was like this:

(SELECT * FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%only three doors%" OR `joke` LIKE "%only three doors%") ORDER BY `ups` DESC,`downs` ASC LIMIT 10)
UNION ...

Then you would see the first ten records that would be returned based on that order, but they wouldn't necessarily be displayed in order.

UPDATE:

Try this -

(SELECT *, 1 as ob FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%only three doors%" OR `joke` LIKE "%only three doors%") )
UNION
(SELECT *, 2 as ob FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%only%" OR `joke` LIKE "%only%") )
UNION
(SELECT *, 3 as ob FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%three%" OR `joke` LIKE "%three%") )
UNION
(SELECT *, 4 as ob FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%doors%" OR `joke` LIKE "%doors%"))
 ORDER BY `ob`, `ups` DESC,`downs` ASC LIMIT 0, 30
share|improve this answer
    
Do you have any ideas on how to make it work the way that I would like it to? Essentially I want to combine the different queries, and have each one individually sorted by there ups and downs, then combined, one after another. –  kelton52 Dec 30 '11 at 23:58
    
So the first query sorted, then the second sorted. If the first is greater than 30, then it would only show the first 30 in the first query. –  kelton52 Dec 30 '11 at 23:59
    
Bleh, that's a tough one. You're saying you don't want to sort the entire set correct? Just append one sorted set to the end of another and take the first 30? –  Abe Miessler Dec 31 '11 at 0:03
    
That's correct. There is paging so when someone goes to the next page i'll limit 30,60 etc. –  kelton52 Dec 31 '11 at 0:05
    
Ok, think I found a solution. Check out my update –  Abe Miessler Dec 31 '11 at 0:05

What the query does, is to order each sub-query separately and unifying all of them. There is no guarantee the result would be ordered.

what you need to do is to order the unified query as such:

Select * from (
  (SELECT *, 1 as `p` FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%only three doors%" OR `joke` LIKE "%only three doors%"))
  UNION
  (SELECT *, 2 as `p` FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%only%" OR `joke` LIKE "%only%"))
  UNION
   (SELECT *, 3 as `p` FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%three%" OR `joke` LIKE  "%three%"))
  UNION
  (SELECT *, 4 as `p` FROM `jokes` WHERE `flags` < 5 AND (`title` LIKE "%doors%" OR `joke` LIKE "%doors%"))
    ) ORDER BY `p` ASC, `ups` DESC,`downs` ASC
share|improve this answer
    
I had thought about that, but as I mentioned above, that's not the result i'm looking for. All results from the first query should always come before any from the second. –  kelton52 Dec 31 '11 at 0:01
1  
I edited the query to fit your needs (added an additional field 'p') –  Uri Goren Dec 31 '11 at 0:07
1  
I'd give it to you, but the other guy had the correct solution first. Thanks though –  kelton52 Dec 31 '11 at 0:10
    
Another thing with this query, surrounding the whole thing in a Select * FROM actually returns no results –  kelton52 Dec 31 '11 at 0:26

You should be able to use UNION ALL to remove duplicate removal (and also complete result set sorting). Using that the result set should be in the order of the select statements in the query.

share|improve this answer
    
So just replace UNION with UNION ALL? –  kelton52 Dec 31 '11 at 0:14
    
Try it, see if it helps, if not, i wasted not more than 20 seconds of your time :) .. (i don't have a local mysql handy to test it out, but it should make a difference) –  cairnz Dec 31 '11 at 0:15
    
wait, I don't want duplicates. –  kelton52 Dec 31 '11 at 0:16
    
but thanks anyways –  kelton52 Dec 31 '11 at 0:16
    
Then stick with adding the additional column to sort by, as in the answer already accepted. –  cairnz Dec 31 '11 at 0:18

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