Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First, a quote from the ole' manual on ArrayAccess::offsetSet():

This function is not called in assignments by reference and otherwise indirect changes to array dimensions overloaded with ArrayAccess (indirect in the sense they are made not by changing the dimension directly, but by changing a sub-dimension or sub-property or assigning the array dimension by reference to another variable). Instead, ArrayAccess::offsetGet() is called. The operation will only be successful if that method returns by reference, which is only possible since PHP 5.3.4.

I'm a bit confused by this. It appears that this suggests that (as of 5.3.4) one can define offsetGet() to return by reference in an implementing class, thus handling assignments by reference.

So, now a test snippet:

(Disregard the absence of validation and isset() checking)

class Test implements ArrayAccess{

    protected $_data = array();

    public function &offsetGet($key){
        return $this->_data[$key];
    }

    public function offsetSet($key, $value){
        $this->_data[$key] = $value;
    }

    public function offsetExists($key){ /* ... */ }

    public function offsetUnset($key){ /* ... */ }

}

$test = new Test();

$test['foo'] = 'bar';
$test['foo'] = &$bar; // Fatal error: Cannot assign by reference to
                      // overloaded object in

var_dump($test, $bar);    

Ok, so that doesn't work. Then what does this manual note refer to?

Reason
I'd like to permit assignment by reference via the array operator to an object implementing ArrayAccess, as the example snippet shows. I've investigated this before, and I didn't think it was possible, but having come back to this due to uncertainty, I (re-)discovered this mention in the manual. Now I'm just confused.


Update: As I hit Post Your Question, I realized that this is likely just referring to assignment by reference to another variable, such as $bar = &$test['foo'];. If that's the case, then apologies; though knowing how, if it is at all possible, to assign by reference to the overloaded object would be great.


Further elaboration: What it all comes down to, is I would like to have the following method aliases:

isset($obj[$key]);       // $obj->has_data($key);

$value = $obj[$key];     // $obj->get_data($key);

$obj[$key] = $value;     // $obj->set_data($key, $value);

$obj[$key] = &$variable; // $obj->bind_data($key, $variable);
// also, flipping the operands is a syntactic alternative
$variable = &$obj[$key]; // $obj->bind_data($key, $variable);

unset($obj[$key]);       // $obj->remove_data($key);

As far as has, get, set, and remove go, they're no problem with the supported methods of ArrayAccess. The binding functionality is where I'm at a loss, and am beginning to accept that the limitations of ArrayAccess and PHP are simply prohibitive of this.

share|improve this question
    
+1 this is a perfect example of a good question. –  alex Dec 30 '11 at 23:56
    
@alex -- Thanks :) –  Dan Lugg Dec 30 '11 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This does not work with ArrayAccess, you could add yourself a public function that allows you to set a reference to an offset (sure, this looks different to using array syntax, so it's not really a sufficient answer):

class Test implements ArrayAccess{

    protected $_data = array();

    public function &offsetGet($key){
        return $this->_data[$key];
    }

    ... 

    public function offsetSetReference($key, &$value)
    {
        $this->_data[$key] = &$value;
    }
}

$test = new Test();
$test['foo'] = $var = 'bar';
$test->offsetSetReference('bar', $var);    
$var = 'foo';    
echo $test['bar']; # foo    
$alias = &$test['bar'];    
$alias = 'hello :)';    
echo $var; # hello :)

Probably such a function was forgotten when ArrayAccess was first implemented.

Edit: Pass it as "a reference assignment":

class ArrayAccessReferenceAssignment
{
    private $reference;
    public function __construct(&$reference)
    {
        $this->reference = &$reference;
    }
    public function &getReference()
    {
        $reference = &$this->reference;
        return $reference;
    }
}


class Test implements ArrayAccess{
    ...
    public function offsetSet($key, $value){
        if ($value instanceof ArrayAccessReferenceAssignment)
        {
           $this->offsetSetReference($key, $value->getReference());
        }
        else
        {
           $this->_data[$key] = $value;
        }
    }

Which then works flawlessly because you implemented it. That's probably more nicely interfacing than the more explicit offsetSetReference variant above:

$test = new Test();
$test['foo'] = $var = 'bar';
$test['bar'] = new ArrayAccessReferenceAssignment($var);

$var = 'foo';
echo $test['bar']; # foo
$alias = &$test['bar'];
$alias = 'hello :)';
echo $var; # hello :)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @hakre -- I've already got a public facing bind_data($key, &$variable) method, I was just trying to alias it. 5.4 would have been a good time to fix this (among other things) -- ah well, 6 will be here soon! :P –  Dan Lugg Dec 31 '11 at 0:18
    
There are probably other ways around, like assigning a special object type that represents a reference. I'll try to outline it and add some code. –  hakre Dec 31 '11 at 10:58
    
Thanks @hakre -- It's tricky, I know; without gratuitous workarounds it may be impossible. Ultimately $obj[$key] = &$value needs to invoke $obj->bind_data($key, $value) transparently, however given it is impossible it's no major loss. I've learned to accept the limitations of PHP but I can't help question them sometimes. –  Dan Lugg Dec 31 '11 at 11:12
    
I added some other little chunk of code, I don't think it looks that bad, maybe the classname is a bit lengthy ;) –  hakre Dec 31 '11 at 11:23
    
Thanks @hakre -- That is a solid solution, however it deviates from the simplicity I was hoping to afford by this aliasing. I considered a similar (essentially identical) solution previously, but the introduction of an arbitrary object as a stand-in, just to force the reference handling, is something I couldn't see using in production. Inarguably it works, but it's clunky. I updated my question, just to eliminate any ambiguity of what I'm after, but you see where I'm going. –  Dan Lugg Dec 31 '11 at 11:29

What the manual is referring to are so called "indirect modifications". Consider the following script:

$array = new ArrayObject;
$array['foo'] = array();
$array['foo']['bar'] = 'foobar';

In the above script $array['foo'] = array(); will trigger a offsetSet('foo', array()). $array['foo']['bar'] = 'foobar'; on the other hand will trigger a offsetGet('foo'). Why so? The last line will be evaluated roughly like this under the hood:

$tmp =& $array['foo'];
$tmp['bar'] = 'foobar';

So $array['foo'] is first fetched by ref and then modified. If your offsetGet returns by ref this will succeed. If not you'll get some indirect modification error.


What you want on the other hand is the exact opposite: Not fetch a value by reference, but assign it. This would theoretically require a signature of offsetSet($key, &$value), but practically this is just not possible.

By the way, references are hard to grasp. You'll get lots of non-obvious behavior and this is especially true for array item references (those have some special rules). I'd recommend you to just avoid them altogether.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @NikiC -- That feature I was aware of, however it was the last in the list of circumstances, "...or assigning the array dimension by reference to another variable." that got me. In my excitement, I believe I misunderstood; instead trying to do the reverse. As far as actually accomplishing what I'm after, it doesn't appear to be possible, does it? –  Dan Lugg Dec 31 '11 at 0:13
    
Regarding your update -- I'm working on a micro-framework shell, it leverages callbacks and nested "context" objects with cascading data maps, allowing for arbitrary module loading/merging. I've got a pretty good handle on the behaviour of references in this regard, as data needs to be bound (by reference) to be passed from scope to scope (context to context) however I think I just shat my pants a little when I thought I had read what I read. Though, this would have been a nice syntactic-sugar alias for by bind_data() methods. Either way, thanks @NikiC :) –  Dan Lugg Dec 31 '11 at 0:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.