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I have been trying to take chars from a txt file(in which the words of the text that will become strings will be separated by spaces) and import them into strings in my code. I tried it but I only could print the words (that are separated by spaces). How can I input them into strings?

The code that prints the words is the following, but I also need it to save the string into arrays or pointers if possible.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(){
    FILE *fp;
    int i=0;
    char *words=NULL,*word=NULL,c;
    if ((fp=fopen("monologue.txt","r"))==NULL){ /*Where monologue txt is a normal file with plain text*/
        printf("Error Opening File\n");
        exit(1);}
    while ((c = fgetc(fp))!= EOF){
        if (c=='\n'){ c = ' '; }
        words = (char *)realloc(words, ++i*sizeof(char));
        words[i-1]=c;}
    word=strtok(words," ");
    while(word!= NULL){
        printf("%s\n",word);
        word = strtok(NULL," ");}
    exit(0);
}
share|improve this question
    
Sounds like you need some sort of data structure for the words. How about a linked list? –  cha0site Dec 31 '11 at 0:06
    
i thought about that but my problem is not the data type i am going to save the strings but how i am going to do that –  Melkon Dec 31 '11 at 0:08
    
but in text file what is the separator between strings ? –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Dec 31 '11 at 0:09
    
Allocate some memory for the word, strncpy the string over, move on to to the next word, and so on? Maybe use strlen to find out the length of the string, it's safe to do that on what strtok gives you because the NUL-terminator is guaranteed to be there –  cha0site Dec 31 '11 at 0:11
4  
Please note that c should be declared an int type -- char c is not large enough to contain all the legal return values from fgetc(3) -- which can return every char value and EOF return type. –  sarnold Dec 31 '11 at 0:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this. I've modified very little about your code, just to keep it close to your starting point. The main thing I did was add allwords which is an array of char * (this is where I store each string one by one). Then right after printing each version of word (what you were already doing), I also copied it into the next open slot in the allwords array. At the end I added another printing loop to display the contents of each string.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define MAXWORDS 999

int main(){
    FILE *fp;
    int i=0, j;
    char *words=NULL,*word=NULL,c;
    char *allwords[MAXWORDS];

    if ((fp=fopen("monologue.txt","r"))==NULL){ /*Where monologue txt is a normal file with plain text*/
        printf("Error Opening File\n");
        exit(1);}
    while ((c = fgetc(fp))!= EOF){
        if (c=='\n'){ c = ' '; }
        words = (char *)realloc(words, ++i*sizeof(char));
        words[i-1]=c;}
    word=strtok(words," ");
    i=0;
    while(word!= NULL && i < MAXWORDS){
        printf("%s\n",word);
        allwords[i] = malloc(strlen(word));
        strcpy(allwords[i], word);
        word = strtok(NULL," ");
        i++;        
    }
    printf("\nNow printing each saved string:\n");
    for (j=0; j<i; j++)
        printf("String %d: %s\n", j, allwords[j]);
    exit(0);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Because you preserved so much of the original code, you have many of the problems diagnosed in my answer. Unchecked memory allocation; lack of null-termination for the string containing the file contents; not closing the file; rather inefficient memory allocation. You have also introduced a memory overflow problem because you do not check that the number of words in the monologue is small enough to fit into an array of 999 pointers. Also your malloc(sizeof(word)) should be malloc(strlen(word)+1), I believe. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 31 '11 at 1:53
    
Agreed, I am not a C expert yet and it was not my attempt to solve every issue with the code, only to show a way to store the words. Thanks for the input. –  The111 Dec 31 '11 at 2:05
    
111 thanks for the your code, my problem was in the last while loop where i could figure out what to do. Together with Jonathan's tips i think i should get over my issue. –  Melkon Dec 31 '11 at 13:56

Your code is rather hard to read. Here is almost identical code that is (I submit) considerably more readable:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    const char filename[] = "monologue.txt";
    FILE *fp;
    int i = 0;
    char *words = NULL;
    char *word = NULL;
    int c;
    if ((fp = fopen(filename, "r")) == NULL)
    {
        /*Where monologue txt is a normal file with plain text*/
        fprintf(stderr, "Error opening file %s\n", filename);
        exit(1);
    }   
    while ((c = fgetc(fp)) != EOF)
    {   
        if (c == '\n')
            c = ' '; 
        words = (char *)realloc(words, ++i * sizeof(char));
        words[i-1] = c;
    }   
    word = strtok(words, " ");
    while (word != NULL)
    {   
        printf("%s\n", word);
        word = strtok(NULL, " ");
    }   
    return(0);
}

This shows us that you are slurping the entire file into the string pointed to by words, but you are doing so rather inefficiently in that you are reallocating memory one byte at a time for each byte read. You should be looking to do things much more effectively, by reading bigger chunks of the file into memory. For example, you might allocate an initial buffer of 32 KiB; you could read into that buffer using fread(); if you don't encounter EOF, you could then reallocate the space, doubling the amount available to you. (For testing, you'd start with a much smaller block - maybe 16 bytes, maybe even as small as 4 bytes; this ensures you test the memory reallocation code, whereas 32 KiB would probably seldom exercise the reallocation code.)

You also need to ensure that your string is null terminated; as it stands, it is not. You would need to do a final realloc() to make space for the null terminator too.

You can avoid mapping newlines during input since strtok() can be given a list of characters on which to split, so you can add newline to that list.

To generate a list of words, you need to adapt the loop around strtok(). You might simply count the spaces and newlines and then allocate enough pointers to point to that many words; you might have an overestimate if there are adjacent spaces or newlines, but better over than under. Alternatively, you can can allocate, for sake of argument, 16 pointers. As you process the first 16 words, you use these pointers; when you run out of space, you double the number of pointers allocated, and use the new supply until that runs out. You can use any algorithm that allocates a significant number of pointers (meaning 'more than one' and 'increasing as the number already used goes up') instead of simple doubling, but doubling has its merits (notably, it is simple).

One word of caution: you should never assign the result of realloc() to the variable that is its first argument:

words = (char *)realloc(words, ++i * sizeof(char));  // Bad!

The trouble is that if realloc() fails, you've just wiped out the only pointer to the previously allocated memory, so you have leaked it all. Always assign to a new variable, test that it worked, then copy the result:

char *new_space = (char *)realloc(words, ++i * sizeof(char));
if (new_space == 0)
{
    fprintf(stderr, "Memory allocation failed at size %d\n", i);
    exit(1);
}
words = new_space;

I assembled this code yesterday. Notice that it uses functions to do repeated jobs - such as checking that memory allocation succeeded. There is room to improve it (there always is). It does character at a time input still (and newline mapping, therefore) but allocates increasingly large chunks of memory so that it does not do memory allocation on every character read. The err_exit() function is a useful skeleton; you can flesh it out into a much more complex system, but the basic idea of a function to report errors and exit (with a behaviour similar to fprintf() + exit() can simplify programs a lot (and error checking and reporting is important, but needs to be simple when it can be).

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

static void  err_exit(const char *format, ...);
static void *emalloc(size_t nbytes);
static void *erealloc(void *old_space, size_t nbytes);

int main(void)
{
    const char filename[] = "monologue.txt";
    FILE *fp;
    size_t i = 0;
    size_t len_data = 4;
    char *data = emalloc(len_data);
    int c;

    /* Read data from file */
    if ((fp = fopen(filename, "r")) == NULL)
        err_exit("Error opening file %s\n", filename);

    while ((c = fgetc(fp)) != EOF)
    {
        if (c == '\n')
            c = ' ';
        if (i >= len_data)
        {
            assert(i == len_data);
            data = realloc(data, 2 * len_data);
            len_data *= 2;
        }
        data[i++] = c;
    }
    if (i >= len_data)
    {
        assert(i == len_data);
        data = erealloc(data, len_data + 1);
        len_data++;
    }
    data[i] = '\0';
    fclose(fp);

    /* Split file into words */
    size_t len_wordlist = 16;
    size_t num_words = 0;
    char **wordlist = emalloc(len_wordlist * sizeof(char *));
    char *location = data;
    char *word;

    for (num_words = 0; (word = strtok(location, " ")) != NULL; num_words++)
    {
        if (num_words >= len_wordlist)
        {
            assert(num_words == len_wordlist);
            wordlist = erealloc(wordlist, 2 * len_wordlist * sizeof(char *));
            len_wordlist *= 2;
        }
        wordlist[num_words] = word;
        location = NULL;
    }

    /* Print the word list - one per line */
    for (i = 0; i < num_words; i++)
        printf("%zu: %s\n", i, wordlist[i]);

    /* Release allocated space */
    free(data);
    free(wordlist);

    return(0);
}

static void err_exit(const char *format, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, format);
    vfprintf(stderr, format, args);
    va_end(args);
    exit(1);
}

static void *emalloc(size_t nbytes)
{
    void *new_space = malloc(nbytes);
    if (new_space == 0)
        err_exit("Failed to allocate %zu bytes of memory\n", nbytes);
    return(new_space);
}

static void *erealloc(void *old_space, size_t nbytes)
{
    void *new_space = realloc(old_space, nbytes);
    if (new_space == 0)
        err_exit("Failed to reallocate %zu bytes of memory\n", nbytes);
    return(new_space);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Jonathan thanks for the great tips, as an amateur in c and in programming generally, your help gives me a great insight on what i should be careful of. Thanks again. –  Melkon Dec 31 '11 at 13:55

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