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See the code below - I am trying to put a const object into a vector. I know the answer is "STL containers require objects to be assignable and copy constructable", but, without citing the standard, can anyone explain what the problem with doing this is? I don't understand why a class like this could not be copied (besides that c++ doesn't allow it).

All it is is a value stored that is not allowed to be changed - why can't putting it in a vector simply create another one of these objects?

#include <vector>

// Attempt 1
// /home/doriad/Test/Test.cxx:3:8: error: non-static const member ‘const int MyClass::x’, can’t use default assignment operator

// struct MyClass
// {
//   int const x;
//   MyClass(int x): x(x) {}
// };
// 
// int main()
// {
//   std::vector<MyClass> vec;
//   vec.push_back(MyClass(3));
//   return 0;
// }

// Attempt 2
// /home/doriad/Test/Test.cxx:28:23: error: assignment of read-only member ‘MyClass::x’
struct MyClass
{
  int const x;
  MyClass(int x): x(x) {}
  MyClass& operator= (const MyClass& other)
  {
    if (this != &other)
    {
      this->x = other.x;
    }

    return *this;
  }
};

int main()
{
  std::vector<MyClass> vec;
  vec.push_back(MyClass(3));
  return 0;
}

EDIT:

It is possible to do this with std::set and std::list. I guess it is the sort() function in std::vector that uses assignment. This is not UB right?

#include <set>

// Attempt 1
struct MyClass
{
  int const x;
  MyClass(int x): x(x) {}
  bool operator< (const MyClass &other) const;
};

bool MyClass::operator<(const MyClass &other) const
{
  if(this->x < other.x)
  {
    return true;
  }
  else if (other.x < this->x)
  {
    return false;
  }

}


int main()
{
  std::set<MyClass> container;
  container.insert(MyClass(3));
  return 0;
}
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Semi-related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2759350/… –  cHao Dec 31 '11 at 0:20
    
Please see my edit using std::set instead of std::vector. Is this ok? –  David Doria Dec 31 '11 at 14:06
    
@David : In C++03, using std::set<> like so is still ill-formed -- §23.1/3 mandates that element types must be both copy-constructable and assignable. In C++11, your code is well-formed, but your std::set<> instance will not be assignable because MyClass is not assignable. (Also, only semi-related: your operator< implementation is broken, as it will not return any value if this->x == other.x). –  ildjarn Jan 4 '12 at 19:25
    
ildjarn - you're right about the operator<, just a typo in my post. By "not well-formed", do you mean it could be UB? Or should it not compile? –  David Doria Jan 4 '12 at 22:27
    
@David : Code that is "ill-formed" is generally understood to not be compilable, modulo implementation bugs (however technically an implementation is free to compile it as long as it also "diagnoses" the issue, generally by giving a compiler warning). In this case I suspect that any non-trivial use of an instance of std::set<MyClass> with a C++03 compiler would break, but it ultimately depends totally on the implementation. –  ildjarn Jan 5 '12 at 0:10
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

EDIT2: (Removing a bunch of stuff that doesn't have to work) The C++11 standard states that the insert method for vector and deque (and the default implementation of push_back for that matter) requires the value type to be CopyAssignable, i.e., the value supports:

t= v;

Classes and structs with const members are not CopyAssignable by default, so what you want to do won't work.

This doc (n3173) has an explanation for the various container requirements.

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MSN: then what do I have to do to get it to work? It forced me to implement the assignment operator, but I can't do the assignment because it is const! –  David Doria Dec 31 '11 at 0:08
1  
@David : Simply avoid const data members -- they're useless if your class offers proper const-correct getters. –  ildjarn Dec 31 '11 at 0:10
    
That seems like a hack, not the "right" thing to do. –  David Doria Dec 31 '11 at 0:10
1  
Well, you can't have both: a constant data member and an assignable object. After all, the assignment would, indeed, change the constant data member. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 31 '11 at 0:13
1  
@MSN: The type used in a container must be Assignable, and that means that it requires both copy constructor and assignment operator. Whether your compiler is verifying the Assignable concept or not is a different issue, but I bet that if you try to insert/remove an element from the middle of a vector and the stored type does not provide an assignment operator then your compiler would also fail to compile. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 31 '11 at 1:04
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When you place an object of type MyClass in the std::vector, the vector will make a copy of the object for storage, and not the object you passed to it.

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Sure, that makes sense. But why can't it copy an object with a const value? It should just be able to make a new object with the same const value, no? –  David Doria Dec 31 '11 at 0:10
    
@David : Sure, but you're still missing the 'assignable' requirement. –  ildjarn Dec 31 '11 at 0:13
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One possible solution would be to store pointers to the objects in the vector, because pointers are assignable and copy constructable.

Another possible solution would be to declare x without the const keyword, but ensure that it cannot be modified through encapsulation (i.e. you should declare it as private and don't modify from anywhere outside the constructor)..

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