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I have a problem while programing in Mathematica 8, here is my code:

f[t_, y_] := {y, y};

RungeKutta3[a_, b_, Alpha_, n_, f_] := 
  Module[{h, j, k1, k2, k3}, 
    h = (b - a)/n; 
    Y = T = Table[0, {100 + 1}]; 
    Y[[1]] = Alpha; 
    T[[1]] = a; 
    For[j = 1, j <= n, ++j, 
      k1 = f[T[[j]], Y[[j]]]; 
      k2 = f[T[[j]] + h/2, Y[[j]] + k1*h/2]; 
      k3 = f[T[[j]] + h, Y[[j]] + (-k1 + 2 k2)h]; 
      Y[[j + 1]] = Y[[j]] + h/6(k1 + 4 k2 + k3); 
      (* Print[j, "----->", Y[[j]]];*) 
      T[[j + 1]] = T[[j]] + h;
   ];]; 

RungeKutta3[0., 1., {300., 500}, 2, f];

The thing is, I'm trying to implement a Runge-Kutta method. And I was successful actually, but only with a function f[x_] that had 1 dimension. This code is for 2 dimensions, but it simply doesn't work and I don't know why. Here is an example for a code with 1 dimension only (notice that I have to change the first line to define the function and the last line, when I call "RungeKutta3").

f[t_, y_] := y;

RungeKutta3[a_, b_, Alpha_, n_, f_] := 
  Module[{h, j, k1, k2, k3}, 
    h = (b - a)/n;  
    Y = T = Table[0, {100 + 1}];  
    Y[[1]] = Alpha; 
    T[[1]] = a;  
    For[j = 1, j <= n, ++j,   
      k1 = f[T[[j]], Y[[j]]];   
      k2 = f[T[[j]] + h/2, Y[[j]] + k1*h/2];   
      k3 = f[T[[j]] + h, Y[[j]] + (-k1 + 2 k2)*h];   
      Y[[j + 1]] = Y[[j]] + h/6*(k1 + 4 k2 + k3);   
      (* Print[j, "----->", Y[[j]]];*)     
      T[[j + 1]] = T[[j]] + h;
  ];]; 

RungeKutta3[0., 1., 300., 100, f];

To sum up, how do I implemented the Runge-Kutta method for a function with 2 dimensions??

If you could help me out I would be grateful.

Thanks in advance!

PS: the Runge-Kutta method is order 3

----------------------

Problem solved! Check the code, if anybody needs help with anything, just ask!

f[t_, y1_, y2_] := 3 t*y2 + Log[y1] + 4 y1 - 2 t^2 * y1 - Log[t^2 + 1] - t^2;
F[t_, {y1_, y2_}] := {y2, f[t, y1, y2]}; 
RungeKutta3[a_, b_, [Alpha]_, n_, f_] :=
 Module[{h, j, k1, k2, k3, Y, T, R},
  h = (b - a)/n;
  Y = T = Table[0, {n + 1}];
  Y[[1]] = [Alpha]; T[[1]] = a;
  For[j = 1, j <= n, ++j,
   k1 = f[T[[j]], Y[[j]]];
   k2 = f[T[[j]] + h/2, Y[[j]] + k1*h/2];
   k3 = f[T[[j]] + h, Y[[j]] + (-k1 + 2 k2)*h];
   Y[[j + 1]] = Y[[j]] + h/6*(k1 + 4 k2 + k3);
   T[[j + 1]] = T[[j]] + h;
   ];
  R = Table[0, {n + 1}]; 
  For[j = 1, j <= n + 1, j++, R[[j]] = Y[[j]][[1]]];
  Print[ListPlot[Transpose[{T, R}]]]
  ];

RungeKutta3[0., 1, {1., 0.}, 1000, F];

I know basically have a mathematica program that can solve ANY 2nd order equation! Through Runge-Kutta method. just insert your function on

f[t_, y1_, y2_]:= [Insert your function here]

where t is the independent value, y1 is the function itself y(t), y2 is y'(t). Call the function through:

RungeKutta3[a, b, [Alpha], n, F];

where a is the initial "t" value, b the final "t" value, [Alpha] the initial value of your function and the first derivative (given in the form {y1(a),y2(a0)}), n the number of points equally spaced you want to represent. F is the function you have to insert despite of the function you give to f

Any questions feel free to ask!! PS: The Runge-Kutta problem solves differential equations with problems of initial values, i used this program as a base to solve a problem of boundary values, if you want it just text me!

share|improve this question
    
one quick easy advice, do not name your functions with an Uppercase first letter. Uppercase functions with first letters are used by Mathematica. –  Nasser Dec 31 '11 at 1:53
    
What errors are you getting? How does the output differ from what you expected? –  Verbeia Dec 31 '11 at 2:56
    
I think I've solved the problem! Thanks @NasserM.Abbasi, i know that, i checked before, but yeah ive heard that a lot ;) –  user1123767 Dec 31 '11 at 2:57
2  
@user1123767, would you mind posting your solution, so the rest of us can see? –  rcollyer Dec 31 '11 at 16:24
    
I did it now! check the edit –  user1123767 Jan 2 '12 at 15:06

1 Answer 1

Doesn't your code just implement what is already built into Mathematica, namely, if you were to use the option

Method -> {"ExplicitRungeKutta", "DifferenceOrder" -> 3}

to NDSolve?

(This is not to suggest there's no value in "rolling your own": perhaps you want to do it as a learning exercise for yourself or for students, or as a student yourself.)

share|improve this answer
    
oh yes you are right. I am a student and this is a work i had to do, but my teacher has just told us that such option existed, lol. thanks –  user1123767 Jan 19 '12 at 12:15

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