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I made a image thread class that runs the update method in the instance that is loading the image:

public class ImageThread implements Runnable {
    private Bitmap image;
    private String url;
    private CustomEventField c;


    public ImageThread(String url, CustomEventField c){

        this.url = url;
        this.c = c;
    }

   public void notifyUs(){



        this.c.update(image);
    }

    public void run() {

        Bitmap img =  downloadImage.connectServerForImage(this.url); //data processing

        image = img;

        notifyUs();

    }




}

I send the context in the constructor, however I can only use it for CustomEventField. What if I wanted to use this image class for other classes? I could just make another copy of this class, but I want to keep things organized.

share|improve this question
    
What is custom event field? –  Aaron J Lang Dec 31 '11 at 4:22
    
CustomEventField is the custom field where the image will be drawn and contains the update method. However, I want to replace CustomEventField c with any class. Say if I want to use this class with CustomEntryField, I can't because the class uses CustomEventField. How do I make it "open" so I can pass any object? –  Adam Dec 31 '11 at 5:48
    
Have the thread use an interface to abstract away the classes so it does not deal with the classes directly. Any class that then implements the interface can be used with the thread without having to specialize it for each class. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 31 '11 at 7:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Define a separate interface type that all of your classes can then implement as needed, eg:

ImageThreadCallback.java:

public interface ImageThreadCallback
{
    void update(Bitmap image);
}

ImageThread.java:

public class ImageThread implements Runnable
{
    private Bitmap image;
    private String url;
    private ImageThreadCallback c;

    public ImageThread(String url, ImageThreadCallback c)
    {
        this.url = url;
        this.c = c;
    }

    public void notifyUs()
    {
        this.c.update(this.image);
    }

    public void run()
    {
        this.image = downloadImage.connectServerForImage(this.url); //data processing
        notifyUs();
    }
}

CustomEventField.java:

public class CustomEventField implements ImageThreadCallback
{
    public void update(Bitmap image)
    {
        ...
    }
}

CustomEntryField.java:

public class CustomEntryField implements ImageThreadCallback
{
    public void update(Bitmap image)
    {
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer! I never knew what interfaces did before this example. –  Adam Dec 31 '11 at 18:53

Firstly, ImageThread should probably either extend Thread or be renamed to something like ImageUpdateTask.

As you mentioned in your question, the reason this is hard to reuse is because it is too strongly coupled. This can be solved by abstracting methods to separate interfaces.

public interface Receiver<T> {
    public void pass(T t);
}

-

public class ImageThread extends Thread {
    private Bitmap image;
    private final String url;
    private final Receiver<Bitmap> updater;

    public ImageThread(String url, Receiver<Bitmap> updater) {
        this.url = url;
        this.updater = updater;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        Bitmap img =  downloadImage.connectServerForImage(this.url);
        //data processing

        image = img;
        updater.pass(image);
    }
}

-

public class CustomEventFieldUpdater implements Receiver<Bitmap> {
    @Override
    public void pass(Bitmap image) {
    //TODO
    }
}

-

public class CustomEntryFieldUpdater implements Receiver<Bitmap> {
    @Override
    public void pass(Bitmap image) {
    //TODO
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This wont work, as there are no generics in Blackberry java. It is based on older java version –  rfsk2010 Dec 31 '11 at 16:36

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