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I'm trying to lay out a web page like this:

|-----------------------|
| header (fixed)        | <- no scroll bar
|-----------------------|
| body                | |
|                     | |
|                     | | <- scroll bar
|                     | |
|                     | |
|                     | |
|                     | |
| ... continues ...   | |
| ... so requires ... | |
| ... scroll bar ...  | |
|---------------------|-|

In the old old days I'd have done this with a frameset. I don't want to go that route for a few reasons (including it being deprecated).

In the not-as-old days I thought I'd done this using a height=100% table with two rows as the entire body of the page, and the overflow style set hidden/auto in different places to get the bottom row to have the scroll bar for the main page content. I'd be OK with this as a solution, but I can't remember how to set it up right (I'm pretty sure it involves getting the right page elements set to position:relative or something, but I've been banging my head on the keyboard for two hours trying to get it to work so I give up).

I've read claims that anything you can do with frames/tables you can do with the right divs and css, so I'd really like to see someone show me that solution.

Also note: I only want the scroll bar to appear when needed based on the content (as per overflow:auto) not all the time (overflow:scroll).

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2  
The answer is in your ASCII art diagram. –  BoltClock Dec 31 '11 at 5:59
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a fully working solution to your problem scrollable content under an absolute positioned header with no other scrollbar on the browser window.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
<title>Scrollable 100% high element</title>
<style type="text/css">
* {margin:0;padding:0}
p{margin:0 0 1em 0}
html,body{margin:0;padding:0}
body{
    height:100%;
}
html>body{
    position:absolute;
    width:100%;
}
#content{
    background:#d2da9c;
    overflow:auto;
    position:absolute;
    width:100%;

    left:0;
    top:100px;
    bottom:0;
}

#top{
    position:absolute;
    left:0;
    width:100%;
    top:0px;
    height:100px;
    background:red;
    overflow:hidden;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="wrap">
    <div id="content">
        <p>Start</p>
        <p>test</p>
        <p>test</p>
    </div>
</div>
<div id="top">
    <h1>Header</h1>
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Went with this (without the "wrap" div which I guess was leftover from the other solution), though ideally the solution would allow for the header area to change size based on the content. I originally thought the header would need to get bigger and smaller based on user picks on some dynamic menus, but the client is happy with the fixed-size solution (and it's probably better anyway since it keeps the content area top edge from jumping around...) –  Chuck Wilbur Dec 31 '11 at 22:41
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This is the simple way to do a fixed header it gets a little more complex when you want to do a fixed footer as well. This should work for you though.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
  <style type="text/css">
     body{
      margin:0;
      padding:0;
      position:relative;
     }
     body, html, #wrapper {
        height:100%;
        position:relative;
     }
     #header{
      position:absolute;
      top:0;
      left:0;
      width:100%;
      height:100px;
      background-color:yellow
     }
     #wrapper {
        height:100%;
        padding-top:100px;
     }
    #content{
        overflow:auto;
        height:100%;
    }

    </style>
    </head>
    <body>
    <div id="header"> header </div>
    <div id="wrapper">
        <div id="content"> 
            <p>content </p>

        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

This one is a little better we just need to get rid of the spacing at the bottom to remove the far right scrollbar completely.

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You can play with margin and padding on the content div as needed for placement below the header –  MadScientist Dec 31 '11 at 6:02
    
position:absolute should be position:fixed, obviously. –  BoltClock Dec 31 '11 at 6:04
    
I tried something very similar to this, and I think this will have the same problem. Note how in my ASCII diagram the scrollbar stops at the bottom of the header area. Using an absolute-positioned header, the scroll bar will still extend all the way up the browser window, even though it only scrolls the body area. This was unacceptable to the client (a.k.a. my wife) ;) –  Chuck Wilbur Dec 31 '11 at 6:09
    
I follow give me a min I will try something to get what you want. –  MadScientist Dec 31 '11 at 6:12
    
updated the script above –  MadScientist Dec 31 '11 at 6:32
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