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I am trying to resolve how to clean up my array and my output should be:

1) all numerical indexed and

2) no duplicate values.

This is a sampling of my current array output:

NOTE: index [3]. I am parsing those values into a new array and do not need either of them. They are merged onto the array below as you can see.

Ultimately I am preparing this for .csv format, but I need my array in some type of sequence in order to keep the data in proper presentation form.

Array // print_r();
(
    [0] => 3350
    [id] => 3350
    [1] => Williamson New England Electric
    [company] => Williamson New England Electric
    [2] => bob@jojozzz.go
    [email] => bob@jojozzz.go
    [3] => Pumps & Motors,Electronic Systems,Electrical Supply,Electrical 
    [industry] => Pumps & Motors,Electronic Systems,Electrical Supply,Electrical 
    [4] => Pumps & Motors
    [5] => Electronic Systems
    [6] => Electrical Supply
    [7] => Electrical 
)

This is what I am trying to achieve:

Array
(
    [0] => 3350
    [1] => Williamson New England Electric
    [2] => bob@jojozzz.go
    [4] => Pumps & Motors
    [5] => Electronic Systems
    [6] => Electrical Supply
    [7] => Electrical 
)
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3  
Where did you get the array from? If from a MySQL database, just use mysql_fetch_row instead of mysql_fetch_array: php.net/manual/en/function.mysql-fetch-row.php –  Felix Kling Dec 31 '11 at 11:01
    
I don't think that will work as I need my elements in array for because the last column (industry_type) is a list of comma separated values, and I need to split them into unique array elements. –  OldWest Dec 31 '11 at 11:22
1  
So? It's still easier to retrieve the array as numerical from the beginning and then take the value form the last entry, split it and add the values. –  Felix Kling Dec 31 '11 at 11:25
    
Do you need ONLY values which have a numerical index? If not, do you want the non-numerical indexes to be added on to the end, or should re-indexing occur so as to preserve the initial order? –  abelito Dec 31 '11 at 11:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As I said in my comment, it's probably easier to get the array as numerical array from the beginning, if you get it from a MySQL database:

$row = mysql_fetch_row($result);

Then you can do the following to split the value of the last column:

array_splice($row, -1, 1, explode(',', end($row)));

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Felix, I was misunderstood on my query. Your earlier suggestion made sense. I am currently using explode() to break my industry types up, but I'm going to try your array_splice() idea. Thanks. –  OldWest Dec 31 '11 at 11:40
    
You're welcome :) –  Felix Kling Dec 31 '11 at 11:42
    
This is what I've got and it's working with the exception of a duplicate column [3] (the comma delimited list still shows)... while ($row = mysql_fetch_row($result)) { $industries = explode(",", $row[3]); $merge = array_merge($row, $industries); print_r($merge); } EXAMPLE: Array ( [0] => 3501 [1] => HoHo Sprinkler Co., Inc. [2] => thisisnotreal@notreal.ok [3] => Fire Safety,Fire Protection ,Fire Alarm & Security Systems [4] => Fire Safety [5] => Fire Protection [6] => Fire Alarm & Security Systems ) –  OldWest Dec 31 '11 at 11:51
    
Because you are not removing $row[3]. You can either call unset($row[3]) or use array_splice as I did. –  Felix Kling Dec 31 '11 at 11:54
    
ah I see. It's 4am and I ain't seeing straight. It's not even New Years eve yet.. Happy New Years... zzzzzz –  OldWest Dec 31 '11 at 11:58

See Felix's comment for a possible way to get your array in the right format at source. If thats not possible, this will do the trick;

$array = Array(
  '0' => 3350,
  'id' => 3350,
  '1' => 'Williamson New England Electric',
  'company' => 'Williamson New England Electric',
  '2' => 'bob@jojozzz.go',
  'email' => 'bob@jojozzz.go',
  '3' => 'Pumps & Motors,Electronic Systems,Electrical Supply,Electrical ',
  'industry' => 'Pumps & Motors,Electronic Systems,Electrical Supply,Electrical ',
  '4' => 'Pumps & Motors',
  '5' => 'Electronic Systems',
  '6' => 'Electrical Supply',
  '7' => 'Electrical'
);

$outputArray = array_values( $array );
$uniqueArray = array_unique( $outputArray );

var_dump( $uniqueArray );
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+1 nice use of array_unique, didn't know that existed, very useful. –  abelito Dec 31 '11 at 11:32

Cannot guarantee anything about performance, but you can use is_numeric to ensure (#1) only numerical indexes, and use array_unique to ensure (#2) no duplicates:

$b = filterNonNumericKeysInArray($a);
$b = array_unique($b);

function filterNonNumericKeysInArray($arr) {
    $finalArr = Array();

    foreach ($arr as $key => $val) {
        if (!is_numeric($key)) { continue; }

        $finalArr[$key] = $val;
    }

    return $finalArr;
}
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