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I have the following problem: let's say class Item holds the serial number of a product, and class Book is an Item which inherits class Item's serial number. I have to create and use operator>> for every class. I thought about creating operator>> to Item, and then just call it in the implementation of the istream of the book, but I don't know how.

The code goes like this:

class Item
{
protected:
    int _sn;
public:
    Item();
    ~Item();
    ...
    const istream& operator>>(const istream& in,const Item& x)
        {
        int temp;
        in>>temp;
        x._sn=temp;
        return in;
        }
};

class Book
{
private:
    char _book_name[20];
public:
    Book();
    ~Book();
    ...
    const istream& operator>>(const istream& in,const Book& x)
        {
        char temp[20];
        ////**here i want to use the operator>> of Item**////
        in>>temp;
        strcpy(x._book_name,temp);
        return in;
        }
};

int main()
{
Book book;
in>>book; //here i want to get both _sn and _book_name
}

Is this even possible?

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

First, operator>> has to be a free function or a friend, because the left-hand side is not of your class type. Second, the lhs must also be a non-const reference (because the stream changes state on extraction), the same goes for the second parameter (you change state, it needs to be non-const). With that in mind, here's how the operators should look:

class Item
{
protected:
    int _sn;
public:
    Item();
    ~Item();
    // ...
    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, Item& item){
      return in >> item._sn;
    }
};

class Book
  : public Item
{
private:
    std::string name;
public:
    Book();
    ~Book();
    // ...
    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, Book& book){
      Item& item = book;
      return in >> item >> book.name;
    }
};

Note that I changed your C-style string handling (char name[20] + strncpy) to a std::string, which is what you should be doing in C++.

It can be done even easier if you just implement a from_stream method:

class Item
{
protected:
    int _sn;
public:
    Item();
    ~Item();
    // ...
    virtual void from_stream(std::istream& in){
      in >> _sn;
    }
};

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, Item& item){
  item.from_stream(in);
  return in;
}

class Book
  : public Item
{
private:
    std::string name;
public:
    Book();
    ~Book();
    // ...
    void from_stream(std::istream& in){
      Item::from_stream(in);
      in >> name;
    }
};

Thanks to from_stream being virtual, you never need to reimplement operator>>, it will automatically dispatch to the correct derived class depending with which it was called:

int main(){
  Item item;
  Book book;

  std::cin >> item; // calls operator>>(std::cin, item), them item.from_stream(std::cin)

  std::cin >> book; // calls operator>>(std::cin, book), converting book to its baseclass Item
                    // then calls Book::from_stream(std::cin), which in turn calls Item::from_stream(std::cin)

}
share|improve this answer

If you want to reuse an operator defined in a base class from a derived one, just add this in the derived declaration:

using Base::operator>>;

share|improve this answer

Simply, no, not directly. operator>> can only sensible be member function for stream objects. For normal objects it should be a free function. If you define it as a member function then the class of which it is a member function effectively becomes the left operand and the other parameter becomes the right hand operand. You can't have a two operand form that is a member.

It is possible to use virtual functions in the implementation of operator>> to get polymorphic behaviour for operator>>, e.g.

class Base {
public:
    /* ... */
    virtual void FromStream(std::istream& is);
    /* ... */
};

class Derived : public Base {
    /* ... */
    virtual void FromStream(std::istream& is);
    /* ... */
};

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, Base& base) {
    base.FromStream(is);
    return is;
}
share|improve this answer

You base class' methods like this:

void Derived::foo(args) {
    Base::foo(args);
}

// or

class Derived : public Base {

    int operator<<(int a) {
         Base::operator<<(a);
    }
}

Base is a name of a specific base class (you need to specify it because there could be more direct or indirect base classes).

:: is the "scope operator". It means "Call the function operator<< from the scope of Base".


The above will probably be useful for you some time, but in case of this specific operator and this situation, (as @Xeo has pointed out, thanks!) the operator should be defined as a free function (a friend function perhaps), not a member function, because you only define operator<< or operator>> as a member function when you want it to take this class' object as its first parameter (left operand).

In case of << and >> in the context of streams, conventionally the left operand is the stream, so you need a free function for this operator (a member function for ostream could work as well, but you would have to modify ostream, and you don't want to try that).

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work here, operator>> is not a base class member, but a free function. – Xeo Dec 31 '11 at 11:26
    
Oh thanks :), got confused a bit. – Kos Dec 31 '11 at 11:35

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