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I took up the Python programming language because of its design philosophies, its great community and most importantly for me its beautiful syntax. However, recently I've been a left a little disheartend. In my attempts to customise Django I've come across code that I think syntactically could be cleaner. I'm by no means a seasoned Python programmer, in-fact I've only been using it properly for the past few months. I'd appreciate your insights and your views.

Here are some examples of code I have come across:

Why is there a need for the slash?

from django.contrib.admin.util import get_model_from_relation, \
    reverse_field_path, get_limit_choices_to_from_path

Could this be written more elegantly?

    rel_name = other_model._meta.pk.name
    self.lookup_kwarg = '%s__%s__exact' % (self.field_path, rel_name)
    self.lookup_kwarg_isnull = '%s__isnull' % (self.field_path)
    self.lookup_val = request.GET.get(self.lookup_kwarg, None)
    self.lookup_val_isnull = request.GET.get(
                                  self.lookup_kwarg_isnull, None)
    self.lookup_choices = f.get_choices(include_blank=False)

One thing I don't understand is why the code after the if statement for each and statement is on seperate lines?

def has_output(self):
    if isinstance(self.field, models.related.RelatedObject) \
       and self.field.field.null or hasattr(self.field, 'rel') \
       and self.field.null:
        extra = 1
    else:
        extra = 0
    return len(self.lookup_choices) + extra > 1

This just looks messy!

def choices(self, cl):
    from django.contrib.admin.views.main import EMPTY_CHANGELIST_VALUE
    yield {'selected': self.lookup_val is None
                       and not self.lookup_val_isnull,
           'query_string': cl.get_query_string(
                           {},
                           [self.lookup_kwarg, self.lookup_kwarg_isnull]),
           'display': _('All')}
    for pk_val, val in self.lookup_choices:
        yield {'selected': self.lookup_val == smart_unicode(pk_val),
               'query_string': cl.get_query_string(
                               {self.lookup_kwarg: pk_val},
                               [self.lookup_kwarg_isnull]),
               'display': val}
    if isinstance(self.field, models.related.RelatedObject) \
       and self.field.field.null or hasattr(self.field, 'rel') \
       and self.field.null:
        yield {'selected': bool(self.lookup_val_isnull),
               'query_string': cl.get_query_string(
                               {self.lookup_kwarg_isnull: 'True'},
                               [self.lookup_kwarg]),
               'display': EMPTY_CHANGELIST_VALUE}

Please don't get me wrong, I'm not doing a disservice to the many contributors of Django, on the contrary I really admire them and I'm grateful. I appreciate that maybe it's my lack of experience with Python itself or that bits of code that make the syntax look unclean are in-fact core features of the Python programming language.

Just to make it clear this question is genuine and sincere, I ask this question in the spirit of learning and discussion. If you don't have anything conducive to contribute please don't respond.

Thank You

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closed as not constructive by Juhana, Joachim Pileborg, Mark Lavin, dmeister, Spacedman Dec 31 '11 at 15:32

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2  
All the "\" are there to be able to continue the code in the next line. It's a way to keep rows short (for example, less than 80 characters). Keeping it that way is common, because you can see all the code in the same area. Now, for the "if" conditions, I would have surrounded everything in parentheses, which removes the need for "\" at the end of the line... –  Ricardo Cárdenes Dec 31 '11 at 13:42
2  
@RicardoCárdenes: the backslashes are not required, and they actually are discouraged in the Python style guide. –  Bastien Léonard Dec 31 '11 at 13:44
    
I agree with Bastien, this code could have been written in many other languages very similarly. No use of elegant Python features there. –  Niklas B. Dec 31 '11 at 13:46
    
@BastienLéonard: if you remove the backslashes from that code up there, you'll be rewarded with a rather colorful SyntaxError, I'm afraid. –  Ricardo Cárdenes Dec 31 '11 at 13:48
1  
@RicardoCárdenes: you can use brackets to avoid the backslash. That's what the Python style guide recommends. –  Bastien Léonard Dec 31 '11 at 14:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1) You need slash, because usually, but not always, Django adheres to pep8, where lines should have at most 80 characters. The better way to write this though, is:

from django.contrib.admin.util import (get_model_from_relation,
    reverse_field_path, get_limit_choices_to_from_path)

\ should generally be avoided.

2) There is nothing inelegant with this code. Simply attributes required for making lookup are created. Why do you feel it's not elegant? How would you prefer this to be written?

3) Again to satisfy the need of having line shorter than 80 characters. This could be rewritten using () and made shorter:

def has_output(self):
    extra = (isinstance(self.field, models.related.RelatedObject) and 
             self.field.field.null or hasattr(self.field, 'rel') and self.field.null)
    extra = 1 if extra else 0
    return len(self.lookup_choices) + extra > 1

However since Django uses Python 2.4 (I think they are bumping version soon or already did it), they can't use inline if-else.

On the other hand it could be also written in shorter way:

def has_output(self):
    if isinstance(self.field, models.related.RelatedObject) \
       and self.field.field.null or hasattr(self.field, 'rel') \
       and self.field.null:
        return len(self.lookup_choices) > 0
    else:
        return len(self.lookup_choices) > 1

But I feel the original way is slightly clearer by having the extra variable. Here you would need a comment, why it's either 0 or 1. With extra you don't need a comment and it's perfectly clear. I dislike comments, so I prefer the first way :-)

4) This indeed looks messy. I believe it would be better to split it into three smaller methods, each potentially yielding someting. But then I am not sure that it's allowed in python2.4 (or python2.5) to yield from subroutine (I have some vague memory, that this was introduced later or even in py3). Anyway I would put creation of those dictionaries into a separate methods, because it seems very untrivial. What I would prefer is this:

def choices(self, cl):
    from django.contrib.admin.views.main import EMPTY_CHANGELIST_VALUE
    yield self._some_default_choice()
    for pk_val, val in self.lookup_choices:
        yield self._choice_from_lookup_choices(pk_val, val)
    if isinstance(self.field, models.related.RelatedObject) \
       and self.field.field.null or hasattr(self.field, 'rel') \
       and self.field.null:
        yield self._some_conditional_choice()

Of course I would use some more meaningful names for submethods, but I don't see the full context and I don't really know what those choices are.

Finally:

What you see here is Python2 pushed to its limits. Django is a big framework. There are some features that are simply result of Django being large project, that has been now developed for several years and people learning new stuff. Fortunately Django developers are slowly removing stuff they believe is wrong, e.g. changing default project structure in Django 1.4, deprecating stuff and bumping python version. You can actually learn a lot from reading django code and asking questions. You probably can learn even more by trying to refactor some code and then learning, why it's not that easy and why it must be left the way it is ;-) Try it, it will be fun :-)

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Many thanks for the enlightenment. –  Imran Azad Dec 31 '11 at 15:51

I appreciate that maybe it's my lack of experience with Python itself or that bits of code that make the syntax look unclean are in-fact core features of the Python programming language.

That's just it. As you continue to code you'll realize that what you were experiencing was a result of everything being new. That type of code will happen in just about any language because the language is only ever going to be describing the communication between objects and function that respond to messages.

A good exercise is just to glance over the codebase and get a feel for it. After a while you will get accustomed to the code and relations being expressed.

So to summarize, the 'ugliness' is not exclusive to Python, but you will soon being to perceive it as just code as you begin to familiarize yourself with the language and become unconsciously competent and fluent in using the language.

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Thank you, I thought so that was the case. Thanks for the insight, really appreciate it. –  Imran Azad Dec 31 '11 at 13:55
    
I don't think that one sentence is finished (end of first paragraph) –  Niklas B. Dec 31 '11 at 14:01

For the \ at least: it's common to want lines to contain at most 80 characters (there are many reasons for this; makes it easier to read or to have multiple files open side by side, never have to scroll, convention/tradition, etc.). The \ makes it possible to break a (logical) line into several actual lines without causing indentation errors.

The first example, without the backslash, might be written

from django.contrib.admin.util import get_model_from_relation, reverse_field_path, get_limit_choices_to_from_path

Notice how you have to scroll right to see the whole thing, which is awkward. An alternative for keeping those imports to 80 characters would be

from django.contrib.admin.util import get_model_from_relation
from django.contrib.admin.util import reverse_field_path
from django.contrib.admin.util import get_limit_choices_to_from_path

But now you have to repeat the imported module, which is ugly. Ultimately it comes down to a matter of style/personal preference.

More generally, it's not uncommon for library code to look messy or unconventional -- sometimes you sacrifice the cleanliness of the implementation in the interest of exposing a nicer interface. Django in particular is often guilty of this. The syntax for declaring models, for instance, or for customizing the admin site, or the whole business with using keyword arguments to make database queries -- it's all really nice to use, but the code that makes it all work can be hard to wrap one's head around.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that's really helpful. –  Imran Azad Dec 31 '11 at 13:54

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