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I'm having a problem setting a passed pointer to nil. When I run the following code through GDB I see that the passed variable "string" is locally set to nil within the called function, but in the scope where it is called it is still pointing to the original memory address. I figure the solution to this problem will involve a combo of reference and dereference operators, I am just not good enough at the fundamentals to figure this one out :)

#import "AppDelegate.h"


@interface AppDelegate()

+(void)releaseAndNullify:(id)input;

@end


@implementation AppDelegate
@synthesize window;


-(void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
 NSString *string = [NSString string];
 [AppDelegate releaseAndNullify:string];
}


+(void)releaseAndNullify:(id)input
{
 if (input)
 {
  [input release];
  input = nil;
 }
}


-(void)dealloc
{
 [window release];

 [super dealloc];
}


@end
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1  
Hi possibly this has already been asked here though it's not quite what your describing –  T I Dec 31 '11 at 14:55
    
Thanks, I did not see this link before :) –  banDedo Dec 31 '11 at 14:59
    
What exactly are you trying to accomplish? –  Andrew Madsen Dec 31 '11 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

Objective-C parameters are passed by value, not reference.

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so your saying that by passing string to releaseAndNullify you have essentially copied the value of string and nullified that copy? –  T I Dec 31 '11 at 15:03
    
Your answer led me to a post that helped. –  banDedo Dec 31 '11 at 15:05
    
@PatrickHogan Thanks will read through that again as just skimmed –  T I Dec 31 '11 at 15:06
    
It's true that parameters are passed by value, but it's a bit confusing because we use pointers, i.e. references, to refer to objects. –  Caleb Dec 31 '11 at 15:16
    
@TomIngram -- I'm saying that the pointer has been copied, and hence modifying it does not modify the pointer in the caller. It's important to understand the difference between a pointer to something and the something itself. –  Hot Licks Dec 31 '11 at 19:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is the fix I found from another post:

#import "AppDelegate.h"


@interface AppDelegate()

+(void)releaseAndNullify:(NSString **)input;

@end


@implementation AppDelegate
@synthesize window;


-(void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
 NSString *string = [NSString string];
 [AppDelegate releaseAndNullify:&string];
}


+(void)releaseAndNullify:(NSString **)input
{
 if (!*input) return;

 [*input release];
 *input = nil;
}


-(void)dealloc
{
 [window release];

 [super dealloc];
}


@end
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