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An interview question.

How to implement division by addition? suppose they are all int.

My idea

  1. Add divisor to itself until it is larger than dividend. Each iteration, keep the sum result before addition.
  2. The quotient is the sum result before the last addition. the remainder can be counted by adding 1 until the quotient * divisor + reminder == dividend.

It is O(e^n), any better ideas? bit operation?

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1  
Is this homework? Otherwise, why would you need to do this? –  ziesemer Dec 31 '11 at 17:59
1  
Is this homework (if not: why do you need this)? And just addition, or is substraction allowed too? –  Grizzly Dec 31 '11 at 18:00
    
What operators are allowed as well as addition ? Anything but division itself ? –  Paul R Dec 31 '11 at 18:01
3  
You contradict yourself. First you say that only addition is allowed as an operation, then you say that maybe bit operations would be better? Are you allowed to use those? If yes, you can do a binary search by bit-shifting the divisor in a loop. –  Niklas B. Dec 31 '11 at 18:10
2  
O(n)? what is n? Usually in such algorithms n will be the number of digits, so it would be O(2^n) in fact. –  ybungalobill Dec 31 '11 at 18:19
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3 Answers

You would break the division into its logarithmic components and then compute those.

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dividing m by n:

int r = m;
int q = 0;

while( r >= n )
{
    int k = 1;
    int x = n;
    int t;

    while( ( t = x+x ) < r )
    {
        x = t;
        k += k;
    }

    q += k;
    r -= x;
}

The result is q - quotient, r - remainder.

The idea is that x+x is the same as x*2.

UPD:

Some may complain that r -= x is not addition. Well we may update the algorithm to not use subtraction:

int p = 0;
int q = 0;

while( p+n <= m )
{
    int k = 1;
    int x = n;
    int t;

    while( p + ( t = x+x ) < m )
    {
        x = t;
        k += k;
    }

    q += k;
    p += x;
}

The result is q - quotient.

If we need the remainder then we proceed as follows (p - output from the above):

int r = 0;

while( p < m )
{
    int x = 1;
    int t;

    while( p + ( t = x+x ) < m )
    {
        x = t;
    }

    r += x;
    p += x;
}

The result is r - remainder.

The algorithm has obviously polynomial (not exponential) running-time.

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In digital arithmetic we can name restoring and non-restoring methods as simple division algorithms which are based on addition/subtraction. Number of iterations in these methods are of O(n) (where n is the number of bits). There are methods like Newton-Raphson or reciprocal calculation which are based on multiplication and number of iterations in them are of O(log n). Take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Division_%28digital%29

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