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I want to learn to write method definition in my class. i.e:

    public int myMethod()
    {
    //This method is used for ....bla bla bla....
    }

I want to inform user about what methods do. In .Net you can write this definition and you can see the explanation when you write the method. How can it be done in JAVA ?

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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Fleshing out some of the other answers.

The first sentence should be third-person declarative sentence that answers the question "What does the method do," e.q., "Creates a foobar." Also, the first sentence is used as the summary comment, so it should be as clear, and concise, as possible.

For example, if your method read in a file and returned an integer status:

/**
 * Reads in config file and initializes application.
 *
 * @return Application status; 0 if everything is okay.
 */
public int myMethod() {
    // ...
}

IMO adding unnecessary details is just that--unnecessary. Some methods are self-documenting, the canonical example being getters/setters:

/**
 * Sets first name.
 *
 * @param firstName Name to set.
 */
public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
    this.firstName = firstName;
}

Redundant comment. Similarly, well-named methods can avoid needing extensive, or any, docs:

public List<User> getAllUsers() { ... }
public User findUserById(Long id) { ... }

IMO unless there's something actually remarkable, there's no need to remark.

HTML is used to mark up Javadocs, but IMO it's a good idea to format it in such a way that it can be read in multiple formats (editor, IDE, Javadocs, etc.) so I tend to indent and use whitespace to make sure I can see everything in plain text as well as rendered.

The standard doclet assumes HTML: whitespace is ignored unless made explicit via <p> or <br> tags.

/**
 * Builds and returns the current list of ingredients.
 *
 * <p>
 *   <b>Note:</b> Initializes ingredient information if necessary.
 * </p>
 */

Useful links:

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thanks. That works well... –  Ahmet Hüdai AYDIN Dec 31 '11 at 18:30
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do this way:

/**
* This method is used for..
*/
public int myMethod()
{

}

and for params use like this:

/**
* This method is used for..
* @param v pass this to do something
*/
public int myMethod(Object v)
{

}

Complete detail here: oracle.com

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Add it as a /** ... */ comment above the method:

/**
*  This method is used for ....bla bla bla....
*/
public int myMethod()
{

}

Eclipse will autogenerate a Javadoc method signature comment once you type /** and hit enter to go to the next line.

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Who's to guarantee that the person is using an IDE (let alone Eclipse)? –  Makoto Dec 31 '11 at 18:05
    
@Makoto JavaDoc is not IDE specific, nor do you even need one - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Javadoc - usually it's turned into HTML, like this: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/String.html –  Matthew Gilliard Dec 31 '11 at 18:08
    
@Makoto No guarantee, just saying Eclipse will do that, and probably Netbeans/IntelliJ as well. I'm not sure why one would not use an IDE, unless they don't know better, dislike tools which provide convenience and increase development speed, or otherwise believe that zen is achieved by developing in vi/emacs/Textpad/Notepad/Xcode/etc/etc. –  Kaleb Brasee Dec 31 '11 at 18:09
    
@MatthewGilliard: It isn't, but implying that something will autogenerate implies use of an IDE. I don't use an IDE (it's more or less a glorified text editor), and I don't have the ability to autogenerate Javadoc; I'd have to fill it in manually. That's the point I was getting at. –  Makoto Dec 31 '11 at 18:09
    
@Makoto I see what you mean, sorry. BTW I think you are missing out if you think IDE is just a text editor... –  Matthew Gilliard Dec 31 '11 at 18:12
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It's advantageous to use Javadoc before a function if you must document it.

/**
 * Does [fill in the blank here]
 * @return An integer stating [what it does]
 */
public int myMethod() {
    // Fill in the rest here
}
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See How to Write Doc Comments for the Javadoc Tool. (Basically, you're looking for what are called Javadocs.)

See the other answers posted here for some examples.

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You need to use javadoc comment to achive this. Something like below

/** * This method is used for.. */ public int myMethod() {  } 

Here is a link for more on Javadoc methodsJavadoc methods

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