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I can't seem to convert the following algorithm into Java successfully, please forgive the horrible picture quality but a question I'm working on asks:

Euclidean Algorithm

I have tried to use the following code to represent the Euclidean Algorithm, but it doesn't seem to work. I don't really know how I would go about representing it in Java code. Any help?

public static int gcd(int x, int y) {
    if (y == 0) {
        return x;
    } else if (x >= y && y > 0) {
        return gcd(y, (x % y));
    }
}

Thank you.

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You're following the text-book algorithm correctly. It's just that the text-book algorithm is incomplete - as it doesn't consider the case where neither category is satisfied. –  Mysticial Dec 31 '11 at 18:19
    
How does it not work? What actually happens when you call it? What arguments do you pass, and what does it return? –  Keith Thompson Dec 31 '11 at 18:20
5  
@KeithThompson I'm sure that OP's immediate problem is that the code does not compile. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 31 '11 at 18:22
1  
@dasblinkenlight: Ah, quite right. The OP still should have mentioned that, rather than "but it doesn't seem to work". –  Keith Thompson Dec 31 '11 at 19:16
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no arbitrary order between x and y.

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return y == 0 ? x : gcd(y,x%y); is all you need. doesn't matter which is greater. It will however take 1 recursion more though. –  st0le Jan 2 '12 at 7:45
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Your code is not complete!

What if x < y? Your code does not return a value then!

What the book fails to mention is that the two parameters to the function do not necessarily need to be in descending order (ie x >= y). What you need to do is compute the gcd considering this fact.

Simply you can do the following:

public static int gcd ( int x , int y )
{
    if ( y == 0 )                        
        return x;
    else if ( x >= y && y > 0)
        return gcd ( y , x % y );
    else return gcd ( y , x );        // if x < y then go ahead and switch them around.
}
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You are almost there. You need to consider what happens when y > x, and return the result from the final else branch (hint: x and y can freely switch places).

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You are almost there.

Your code does not compile, because there is no catch all clause that return from the function.

It really depends on whether you are going to pass negative values of y into this function. If you expect only positive values, just throw an exception.

public static int gcd(int x, int y) {

    if (y == 0) {

        return x;

    } else if (x >= y && y > 0) {

        return gcd(y, (x % y));

    }

    throw
        new IllegalArgumentException(
            String.format(
                "Unexpected values for x(%d) and y(%d)",
                Integer.valueOf( x ),
                Integer.valueOf( y )
            )
        );
}
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Ideally I would like to include negative values. –  mino Dec 31 '11 at 18:22
1  
@m92 The recurrence formula from the assignment does not cover negative numbers. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 31 '11 at 18:26
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