Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following:

class Bind
{
    public string x { get; set; }
    public string y { get; set; }
}
public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        ObservableCollection<Bind> cX = new ObservableCollection<Bind>();
        ObservableCollection<Bind> cY = new ObservableCollection<Bind>();
        cX.Add(new Bind { x = "a", y = "1" });
        cX.Add(new Bind { x = "b", y = "2" });
        cY.Add(new Bind { x = "a", y = "1" });
        foreach (var i in cX)
        {
            if (!cY.Contains(i)) { lv.Items.Add(i); } //lv is a ListView control
        }
    }
}

Why does it add x = "a", y = "1" to the ListView?

If I change ObservableCollection to List or Collection, it does the same.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The 'Contains' method uses the Equals on object, and this simply checks that the memory addresses are different.

Consider changing your class to this...

 class Bind : IEquatable<Bind> {
     public string x { get; set; }
     public string y { get; set; }
     public bool Equals(Bind other)
     {
         return x == other.x && y == other.y; 
     } 
}

Your loop will then visit the strongly typed Equals method in your class, and this will result in the behaviour you are after.

NOTE: the string class ALSO inherits from IEquatable of T and that is what allows the equality operator to operate on the content of the string rather than the address of the string.

share|improve this answer

Because that you have added that value set to CX:

cX.Add(new Bind { x = "a", y = "1" });

and to CY:

cY.Add(new Bind { x = "a", y = "1" });

And those are different objects.

If you want to see if a given key is present, you will need to change to a dictionary or use Linq.

share|improve this answer

Because "a" != "a". At least, not always.

Contains() will check memory addresses, not the actual contents. You cannot insert the same object twice, and "a" isn't the same object as "a" (at least, not here).

share|improve this answer
    
I'd probably iterate through all values and check whether they are equal. But I'm not a C# programmer, so there might be an easier way. –  Tom van der Woerdt Dec 31 '11 at 20:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.