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How to get know language (locale) currently Android app uses to display texts to user?

I know I can use Locale.getDefault() to get default OS locale. But it may differ from locale used by app to display text and other resources, if this locale isn't supported by app.


I need to determine language (locale) displayed by the app, thus the app can pass language to the server, so it can localise returned results.

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3 Answers 3

It's on your app configuration, so you can get it with :

getResources().getConfiguration().locale

this is different from

Locale.getDefault()

and shows the Locale that the app uses which can be different.

It can be different because the developer can change it by updating the app configuration, check : Resources.updateConfiguration

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The docs for the 1st fn you list says "Current user preference for the locale, corresponding to locale resource qualifier". If this is 'current user preference' then how is it different from the 2nd fn. Either way, which function of Locale class does one call to get the locale code String (equivalent to resource extension) that can be passed back to server (as in original question)? –  Tom Jan 14 '13 at 17:57
    
This answer mentions the correct way of getting the Locale (first line of code). But it's wrong that there is a difference: Locale.getDefault() is equivalent to the first example. If you want to get the language code, you have to call getLanguage(). –  Marco W. Apr 14 '13 at 1:10
    
Unfortunately, this doesn't work like I need. If set System language, e.g., for Dansk (Danish), getResources().getConfiguration().locale returns da_DK, while display English strings (from values/strings.xml). –  Aleksejs Mjaliks Oct 9 '13 at 10:44
up vote 12 down vote accepted

My own solution is to add to strings.xml key-value pair locale=<locale code>, thus context.getResources().getString(R.string.locale) will return locale code specific for used locale.

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I guess this solution was supposed to be the part of your question. –  Yaqub Ahmad Jan 1 '12 at 4:59
    
@YaqubAhmad I came to this solution later. But I am still waiting for possible better solution. –  Aleksejs Mjaliks Jan 1 '12 at 11:21

You can use the code below. For example, the functions presented below may be placed inside the class extended the Application class.

public class MyApplication extends Application {
    ...
    public static String APP_LANG;
    private Context ctx = getBaseContext();
    private Resources res = ctx.getResources();
    public SharedPreferences settingPrefs;
    ...

    public void restoreAppLanguage(){
    /**
    *Use this method to store the app language with other preferences.
    *This makes it possible to use the language set before, at any time, whenever 
    *the app will started.
    */
        settingPrefs = getSharedPreferences("ConfigData", MODE_PRIVATE);
        String lang = settingPrefs.getString("AppLanguage", "");
        if(!settingPrefs.getAll().isEmpty() && lang.length() == 2){
            Locale myLocale;
            myLocale = new Locale(lang);
            Locale.setDefault(myLocale);
            Configuration config = new Configuration();
            config.locale = myLocale;
            res.updateConfiguration( config, res.getDisplayMetrics() );
        }
    }

    public void storeAppLanguage(int lang) {
    /**
    *Store app language on demand
    */
        settingPrefs = getSharedPreferences("ConfigData", MODE_PRIVATE);
        Editor ed = settingPrefs.edit();

        Locale myLocale;
        myLocale = new Locale(lang);
        Locale.setDefault(myLocale);
        Configuration config = new Configuration();
        config.locale = myLocale;
        res.updateConfiguration( config, res.getDisplayMetrics() );
        ed.putString("AppLanguage", lang);

        ed.commit();
    }

    public void setAppLanguage(String lang){
    /**
    *Use this method together with getAppLanguage() to set and then restore
    *language, whereever you need, for example, the specifically localized
    *resources.
    */
        Locale myLocale;
        myLocale = new Locale(lang);
        Locale.setDefault(myLocale);
        Configuration config = new Configuration();
        config.locale = myLocale;
        res.updateConfiguration( config, res.getDisplayMetrics() );
    }

    public void getAppLanguage(){
    /**
    *Use this method to obtain the current app language name
    */
        settingPrefs = getSharedPreferences("ConfigData",MODE_PRIVATE);
        String lang = settingPrefs.getString("AppLanguage", "");
        if(!settingPrefs.getAll().isEmpty() && lang.length() == 2){
            APP_LANG = lang;
        }
        else APP_LANG = Locale.getDefault().getLanguage();
    }
}

And then wherever in the main code we can write:

public class MainActivity extends ActionBarActivity {
    ...
    MyApplication app;
    ... 
    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        ...
        app = (MyApplication)getApplicationContext();
        ...
        if(settingPrefs.getAll().isEmpty()){
            //Create language preference if it is not
            app.storeAppLanguage(Locale.getDefault().getLanguage());
        }

        //Restore previously used language
        app.restoreAppLanguage();
        ...
    }
    ...
    void SomethingToDo(){
        String lang = "en"; //"fr", "de", "es", "it", "ru" etc.
        ...
        app.getAppLanguage();
        app.setAppLanguage(lang);
        ...
        //do anything
        ...
        app.setAppLanguage(app.APP_LANG);
    }
    ...
}

In your case, you, shortly, may use getAppLanguage() and then check the public variable APP_LANG to obtain what language is currently used.

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