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OS: Windows 7, Compiler: GCC 3.2.3 (MinGW)

I have created those three data structures in C:

#define MAP_NAME_LEN    30
#define MAP_W           25
#define MAP_H           19
#define WORLD_W         32
#define WORLD_H         32

typedef unsigned char byte;

typedef struct Tile
{
    byte type;
    byte character;
    byte fgColor;
    byte bgColor;
};

typedef struct Map
{
    char name[MAP_NAME_LEN];
    Tile overlay[MAP_H][MAP_W];
    Tile underlay[MAP_H][MAP_W];
};

typedef struct World
{
    Map area[WORLD_H][WORLD_W];
};

When I try to create individual instances of Tile and/or Map, it's ok, no problem at all, everything works. But then if I try to create a World, like...

int main()
{
    World world;
}

...the program simply crashes (Windows 7 says that the program has crashed and is looking for a solution, etc). Do you guys have any idea why does that happen?

Thanks!

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1  
Please post the values of MAP_NAME_LEN, MAP_H and MAP_W, WORLD_H and WORLD_W. Probably stack overflow. –  hmjd Dec 31 '11 at 21:02
    
What are MAP_W/H WORLD_W/H defined as? Perhaps you're putting too much on the stack? –  Shaun Hey Dec 31 '11 at 21:03
1  
you're using typedef without declaring a defintion. you should write it like this: typedef struct _Map {...} Map; you can also omit the _Map, to create anonymous struct if you prefer it like that. –  stdcall Dec 31 '11 at 21:03
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Depending on the values of MAP_NAME_LEN, MAP_H, MAP_W, WORLD_H, and WORLD_W, you may have created a MASSIVE structure on the stack. Don't do that. The stack is relatively small, and generally cannot handle allocations of more than a few megabytes total (and often can only handle a few dozen kilobytes of allocation at a time). Given your constant values, you're likely to be running up against these limits - your World structure is nearly 4MB large, way too big to reasonably put on the stack.

So, instead, allocate it on the heap with malloc, or as a global or file-local static variable:

World world;

int main()
{
    /* ... */
}

or

int main()
{
    World *world = malloc(sizeof(*world));
    /* ... */
    free(world);
}
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I've just edited the code to show the values of constants. –  Fernando Aires Castello Dec 31 '11 at 21:06
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My best guess is that your World object exceed the maximum stack size. It depends how you have defined MAP_NAME_LEN, MAP_H, MAP_W and WORLD_H, WORLD_W.

The total size of a World struct is at least: WORLD_H * WORLD_W * (MAP_H * MAP_W * 2 * sizeof(Tile) + MAP_NAME_LEN) (plus any padding the compiler might insert).

Edit

Now that you have added the constants you can calculate that your data structure will consume about 3.5MB (if sizeof(Tile) == 4). That is too much for the stack. The default stack size is usually about 1MB. Use malloc to allocate the data structure on the heap.

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eh? why would tile's members be 32-bit aligned? –  bdonlan Dec 31 '11 at 21:04
    
@bdonlan Many architectures require aligned memory access or incurr a penalty otherwise. A standard compiler optimization is to align struct members on 32bit (on a 32bit system) –  ChrisWue Dec 31 '11 at 21:09
    
I've never seen a compiler do that for chars (which that byte probably is a typedef for). And chances are the OP is on x86 (since he mentioned Windows 7), and the Windows x86 ABI does not align chars. –  bdonlan Dec 31 '11 at 21:11
    
@bdonlan Mh, true - the padding usually comes in when you start mixing in larger types like int. I removed that part –  ChrisWue Dec 31 '11 at 21:19
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The default stack size (with VS2010 anyway) is 1MB.

sizeof(World) == 3921920, which is more than 3x greater than 1MB.

The crash you are seeing is a stack overflow.

You could try and increase the size of the stack (see link on how to do this) or allocate the World object on the heap.

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Indeed, I just found out that by reducing the WORLD_H and WORLD_W both to 23 the program runs fine. If I increase these values then the stack overflows and the program crashes. So I just have to allocate a smaller "world" or like you said, increase the size of the stack or allocate it on the heap. –  Fernando Aires Castello Dec 31 '11 at 21:17
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When you typedef a struct, you have to give a name, the syntax is typedef struct foo { /* ... */ } Foo; (the foo tag is optional).

Edit Now, with the sizes, it's very likely a stack overflow. A Map uses just short of 4KB, so a World comes close to 4MB. As far as I remember, Windows gives you only a smaller stack (methinks it was 1MB?).

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This would not cause a crash. –  bdonlan Dec 31 '11 at 21:05
    
In fact I'm compiling the program as C++ and the compiler does not complain about anything, it's just that for some reason the program crashes when I create a World instance. I'll try reducing the sizes of arrays and see if it still crashes, then I'll see whether it's due to stack overflow. Thank you for your advice! –  Fernando Aires Castello Dec 31 '11 at 21:12
    
@bdonlan Huh? The OP's code shouldn't even compile, much less run. How can use a typedef with no name? What would even be the point of that? –  jlehr Dec 31 '11 at 21:13
    
@Fernando If this is in a C++ codebase, you might want to point that out in your question. –  jlehr Dec 31 '11 at 21:16
    
@jlehr, unnamed typedefs are actually acceptable, at least in GCC: codepad.org/2dFxNsEj It's a bit pointless, but it's not causing the OP's program to crash at runtime, so this isn't answering the question. –  bdonlan Dec 31 '11 at 21:16
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