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I'm working on a system where a MSP430 is communicating with another chip over its SPI bus. I'm sending a series of setup commands over the SPI bus and polling on the slave chip's Ready line. I'm using IAR as my IDE and I'm compiling the code without any optimization. The code looks something like this :

for(int i = 0; i < NUM_SETUP_COMMANDS; i++)
{
    SendSetupCommand(); //puts data in SPI Tx buffer, sets Chip select low

    while(P1IN & 0x40) //wait for Chip ready line to go low
    {
        for(int x; x < 1024; x++)
        { 
            //do nothing 
        }
    }

    HandleReadyLine(); //Transmit/Receive data on SPI bus
 }

With and without the empty inner for loop, this code work correctly. All the setup messages are transmitted across the SPI bus correctly. Without the inner for loop, this code block takes around 10 seconds. With the inner for loop, this code block takes about 100 ms.

It seems like reading P1IN as fast as possible, without the inner for loop, causes P1IN to not get updated as fast. Does this make any sense? Is there a clear reason that adding/removing the inner for loop would cause such a drastic timing change?

share|improve this question
2  
look at the asm, verify the innner loop is not being optimized out. Also verify the while line is doing what you want it to do. Note that re-reading P1IN after the loop is not expected to see the 0x40 bit in the state that the while line saw. If you are optimizing the inner loop disappears, if not optimizing that could be why you are not seeing the state change on the input. – dwelch Jan 1 '12 at 0:32
    
I did check the asm and the inner loop was not being optimized out. "Note that re-reading P1IN after the loop is not expected to see the 0x40 bit in the state that the while line saw" - could you explain that statement further, I don't think I follow. One thing to note is that with and without the for loop P1IN does eventually change state. It will eventually work, it just seems to take much longer without the for loop. – Jesse J Jan 1 '12 at 1:17
    
Also, thanks for the response and the suggestion – Jesse J Jan 1 '12 at 1:27
1  
if you read P1IN in the while loop, that is one sample, if you are expecting to be able to read P1IN later after the loop and expect the same value (perhaps debugging the problem you were seeing) that is a separate sampling of the bit and can be a separate state. If you want to preserve the sample from the while loop assign it to something while(1) { x=P1IN; if(x&0x40==0) break; } do something with x&0x40 – dwelch Jan 1 '12 at 2:11
    
This does not relate to your problem of needing the inter loop but PORT1 has the ability to trigger an interrupt on a high to low translation. So after configuring the interrupt you can clear the flag and then break the loop when P1IFG & 0x40 is true. – Rex Logan Jan 1 '12 at 2:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It shouldn't make any difference.

A few debug suggestions:

I would suggest reducing the iterations of the inner loop to zero to see if that changes the system timing. Also try swapping the inner loop for a nop and see if that has the same effect. You might also take a look at the generated assembly and see if there is anything obvious between the two compilations. Lastly, (if you can) scope the SPI lines and see if there is any difference in behaviour between the two.

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I did try changing the iterations of the inner loop. I found that if the for loop ran for less than 650 iterations or so, then it would act the same as if the for loop wasn't there. I haven't tried using a nop. I'll try that next. Unfortunately, I don't have access to the SPI lines. I only have access to a couple GPIO test points. – Jesse J Jan 1 '12 at 1:13
    
Thanks for the debug suggestions. – Jesse J Jan 1 '12 at 1:26
    
Thought #1 - What happens if you delay 100ms before the first read of P1IN? Thought #2 - Make SendSetupCommand() wait until the transmit buffer is empty to ensure the external IC has received the message before the start of the while loop. – spearson Jan 1 '12 at 10:38
    
Its been a long time since I asked this question and I realized I never accepted an answer. Thanks for the suggestions. – Jesse J Jul 15 '13 at 23:30

The loop is probably optimized. One way to make sure it is not optimized is to preform a dummy computation such as

for(int i = 0; i < NUM_SETUP_COMMANDS; i++)
{
    SendSetupCommand(); //puts data in SPI Tx buffer, sets Chip select low

    while(P1IN & 0x40) //wait for Chip ready line to go low
    {
        volatile unsigned int i;
        for(int x; x < 1024; x++)
        { 
            j++; 
        }
    }
    HandleReadyLine(); //Transmit/Receive data on SPI bus
}

The key here is the "volatile" keyword which forbids optimization of variable j by the compiler, thus your loop should not be removed.

share|improve this answer
    
A little note about the "volatile" keyword in the microcontroller world: Volatile is used on variables that are accessed by ISR (interrupt service routine) and the main code. Theses variable should be fetched from the RAM every time you access it. If some form of optimization put it in a register, for faster access, and at that time an ISR want to access it: the ISR will access the RAM and not the register. Thus two different versions of the same variable could exist. Potentially with different values, which is bad.... – Blup1980 Sep 16 '12 at 8:49

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