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I want to do a loop (for file in *) only 5 times (so it's not a real loop anymore but however) is there anyway to do this?

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2  
In what way does limiting a loop to 5 iterations render it "not a real loop"? – William Pursell Dec 31 '11 at 22:58
    
There is the seq command also. – fge Jan 1 '12 at 12:50
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Put the files in an array, then slice the array.

$ files=(*)
$ for file in "${files[@]::5}" ; do echo "$file" ; done
あいうえお
0000000000-11-005978.txt
0000000000-11-020832.txt
1
,123
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This will only look at the first five items in the directory:

for file in $(ls | head -5)

As Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams points-out, this only works if your filenames don't contain any whitespace. (They likely won't, but something to keep in mind.)

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1  
Unless one of them has whitespace in the filename. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 31 '11 at 22:45
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams Hmm, that's pretty rare, though you are correct. – chrisaycock Dec 31 '11 at 22:53
1  
@chrisaycock: Whitespace in file names it not really rare. for file in "$(ls -1 | head -5)"; do echo "$file"; done does what it's supposed to do. – Dennis Dec 31 '11 at 23:05
1  
@Dennis: that doesn't work, because the double-quotes make it treat all 5 filenames (and the newlines between them) as a single value for $file. Replace the echo command with echo "file='$file'" and you'll see what I mean. – Gordon Davisson Jan 2 '12 at 1:27

Assuming the variable i is undefined or 0 when you enter the loop and is not used in the loop, just add the line:

test $((++i)) -ge 5 && break

in the loop body. The loop will break out during the 5th iteration, so if you put the line at the end of the loop body, your commands will execute 5 times. If your shell supports it, you can also use the less portable

((++i >= 5)) && break
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Here is yet another solution, which only uses bash and no external tools:

let COUNT=0
for FILENAME in *
do
    echo do something to $FILENAME
    let COUNT=COUNT+1
    if (( $COUNT == "5" )); then
        break
    fi
done
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