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I am looking at some code from my father's VBA work. He isn't a pro at it and neither am I. There is a problem and we can't figure it out. To figure it out, I need to know about the ListView's View propoerty. The View property is assigned lvwReport and I am checking it on Google but there is no definition or I am not able to find it. I am surprised because there is no mention of it on any of Microsoft resources either.

Is there anyone/any resource that can tell me what this is exactly?

Here is the code and there is no any other variable called lvwReport as far as I can see:

Private Sub UserForm_Initialize()
    ListView1.View = lvwReport
    ListView1.Gridlines = True
    ListView1.FullRowSelect = True
    ListView1.ListItems.Clear
    ListView1.ColumnHeaders.Clear

    With ListView1.ColumnHeaders
        .Add , , "MY COLUMN 1", 35
        .Add , , "MY COLUMN 2", 30
        .Add , , "MY COLUMN 3", 35
    End With

    For a = 2 To Cells(65000, 1).End(xlUp).Row
        ListView1.ListItems.Add , , Cells(a, "A").Value
        y = ListView1.ListItems.Count
        ListView1.ListItems(y).ListSubItems.Add , , Cells(a, "B").Value
        ListView1.ListItems(y).ListSubItems.Add , , Cells(a, "C").Value
        ListView1.ListItems(y).ListSubItems.Add , , Cells(a, "D").Value
    Next
End Sub

EDIT/NOTE: This is something from a lib called "Microsoft ListView Control 6.0 (SP6)", I added it and problem resolved. However, I don't understand what this is.

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3  
ListView is not native to VBA. Apparently you need to have VB6 installed. If from the VB Editor I select Tools, "Additional Controls" is greyed out. If you have VB6 installed, "Additional Controls" is available and will allow you to select Microsoft ListView. A ListView has a number of alternative views: Icon, Small Icon, List and Report. lvwReport selects the Report view. Try googling "ListView VB" or "ListView VB6" for sites describing ListView. –  Tony Dallimore Jan 1 '12 at 0:49
    
Thanks, I am going to check it –  Yasin Okumus Jan 1 '12 at 1:17
2  
Tony, I suggest you post this as the answer, since it's the ... answer. –  Doug Glancy Jan 1 '12 at 1:44
    
@TonyDallimore I second Doug's comment. –  brettdj Jan 1 '12 at 5:36
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I have expanded my comment and posted it as an answer. –  Tony Dallimore Jan 1 '12 at 10:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

ListView is not native to VBA. Apparently you need to have VB6 installed. If from the VB Editor I select Tools, "Additional Controls" is greyed out. If you have VB6 installed, "Additional Controls" is available and will allow you to select Microsoft ListView.

A ListView has a number of alternative views: Icon, Small Icon, List and Report. If you play with Windows Explorer's View options, you will see these alternatives. lvwReport selects the Report view.

Try googling "ListView VB" or "ListView VB6" for sites describing ListView.

Another option is to download Visual Basic 2010 Express. This is part of the Visual Studio/.NET development environment. The learning curve from VBA syntax to VB 2010 syntax is small. VB 2010 comes with thousands of extra features of which ListView is one. Because ListView is native to VB 2010 it is properly documented. VB 2010 is blindingly fast compared with VBA. The Express versions of the .NET sofware are all free. They may be single user but they are more than adequate for training and initial development. Only when you are ready need you pay to upgrade to a fuller version. The biggest downside, in my view, is there are so many features, it is difficult to find the one you want.

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For what scenario do you find VB.Net faster than VBA with Excel? For all the scenarios I have tested so far its much slower because of the Interop overhead. –  Charles Williams Jan 2 '12 at 9:33
    
Perhaps I could have said "VB 2010 is blindingly fast compared with VBA" more clearly. I was thinking about processing speed. My last employer had a lot of data that was being processing with Excel VBA. By reading the data in to VB 2010 processing there and then copying the results back, I was able to reduce run times from several hours to a minute or two. To be honest they were doing things with Excel that were inappropriate. But the staff knew Excel and VBA and did not want to change. VB 2010 seemed a small step which they were willing to take. –  Tony Dallimore Jan 2 '12 at 10:07
    
In all the comparisons I have done reading data into VB.NEt and copying the results back VB.NET is blindingly SLOW compared to VBA. see fastexcel.wordpress.com/2011/07/07/… Sounds like you wrote efficient VB.NET code compared to very inefficient VBA code –  Charles Williams Jan 2 '12 at 20:26
    
If rapid reading and writing of small quantities of Excel data is the critical factor, VB 2010 will be a poor choice. However, if you want to create an attractive and responsive forms based front end, VB 2010 with its comprehensive range of controls and events is an obvious choice. In response to your comments, I created a simple test involving reading and processing a CSV file; VBA took 4 times as long as VB 2010. The application I mentioned involved a 15 Mb file that was too large for Excel’s native functionality so its processing was all in VBA. VB 2010 can handle files of over 1,500 Mb. –  Tony Dallimore Jan 3 '12 at 14:19
    
Thanks Tony: .Net is slow at interacting with Excel's object model which is what I assumed you were doing. I have not tested native file I/O reads of CSV files so its interesting that you find .NET faster for that. Presumably you were using Excel 2003 since Excel 2007/2010 can natively handle CSV files much larger than 15MB. –  Charles Williams Jan 3 '12 at 17:16

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