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I was trying to work on xcode and ios5 and I have a TWRequest to bring down tweets using the Twitter Api. However, I am confused about how blocks work in iOS5. For example in this code

 [request performRequestWithHandler:^(NSData *responseData, NSHTTPURLResponse *urlResponse, NSError *error) {

    NSDictionary *dictionary = [NSJSONSerialization JSONObjectWithData:responseData options:0 error:&error];
    NSArray* firstParse = [dictionary objectForKey:@"results"];

    for (NSDictionary *post in firstParse) {               
        Tweet *tweetMessage = [[Tweet alloc] init];
        tweetMessage.message =  [post objectForKey:@"text"];
        tweetMessage.user =  [post objectForKey:@"from_user"];

        [tweets addObject:tweetMessage];
    }
}];
NSLog(@"%@",[tweets count]);

Assuming that I have a tweets = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:25]; call somewhere up top.

However, every time I do this, the count is always at zero. After doing some testing, I realized that the block code was running after the NSLog was running signifying that the code did not run from top down as I was use to.

Does anyone know how to fix such an issue?

I also tried this later example because I was trying to move the tweets into a viewController that has an array object

tweetViewController.tweets = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:25];
[request performRequestWithHandler:^(NSData *responseData, NSHTTPURLResponse *urlResponse, NSError *error) {

    NSDictionary *dictionary = [NSJSONSerialization JSONObjectWithData:responseData options:0 error:&error];
    NSArray* firstParse = [dictionary objectForKey:@"results"];

    for (NSDictionary *post in firstParse)
    {               
        Tweet *tweetMessage = [[Tweet alloc] init];
        tweetMessage.message =  [post objectForKey:@"text"];
        tweetMessage.user =  [post objectForKey:@"from_user"];

        [tweetViewController.tweets addObject:tweetMessage];

        NSLog(@"%d",[tweets count]);
        //NSLog(@"%@: %@", [post objectForKey:@"from_user"], [post objectForKey:@"text"]);            
    }
}];

Tweet *tweetMessage = [[Tweet alloc] init];
tweetMessage.message =  @"HELLO";
tweetMessage.user =  @"HELLO";
[tweetViewController.tweets addObject:tweetMessage];
return YES;

The Hello messages display properly but the ones in the block do not.

share|improve this question
    
Don't do synchronous code if you don't absolutely have to. – Tom van der Woerdt Dec 31 '11 at 23:38
    
How would I call the request then? – Jetpackman Jan 1 '12 at 0:29
1  
Just like this, but I meant that you should simply allow the code to execute asynchronously. Place the code that's related to the tweet loading inside the block. – Tom van der Woerdt Jan 1 '12 at 0:31
    
I tried that too now, with this code because I was originally trying to transfer the twitter into a table for a viewController [tweetViewController.tweets addObject:tweetMessage]; and also I tested it outside the block with a ` Tweet *tweetMessage = [[Tweet alloc] init]; tweetMessage.message = @"HELLO"; tweetMessage.user = @"HELLO"; [tweetViewController.tweets addObject:tweetMessage]; return YES; ` the hello message displays correctly on the view controller while the ones in the block do not display – Jetpackman Jan 1 '12 at 1:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Don't. Basically, focus on making your code asynchronous. This'll be better for the user (the UI will be more smooth) and easier for the developer (yes, really!)

Do everything that's related to loading the tweets in the block instead of after it. Place your NSLog in the block instead of outside it. Once you're done loading all the tweets, simply call [tableView performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(reloadData) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:NO]; or something else, to update the UI.

Make sure to avoid using the nonatomic flag on the property that stores the tweets. You want to avoid invalid cross-thread access.

share|improve this answer
    
Just wondering, where would you call the reload data, im currently doing everything within the app delegate – Jetpackman Jan 1 '12 at 1:16
    
You should really use all this code in a View Controller. The App Delegate really shouldn't do any of this - it's responsible for handling the application itself (startup, shutdown, pause, resume, etc). – Tom van der Woerdt Jan 1 '12 at 1:18
    
How does performSelectorOnMainThread work? Do I call it on the view controller or do I do it while inside the view controller. – Jetpackman Jan 1 '12 at 1:33
    
You call it on the UITableView that's supposed to show your tweets, or whatever you are using to show tweets. – Tom van der Woerdt Jan 1 '12 at 1:34
1  
Don't use perform selector its so passé use dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{ <UICODE HERE> }); instead – Tony Million Jan 3 '12 at 21:44

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