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This results in the error "Modification of a read-only value attempted at..."

$mfgs = "AUDBMWCH-FO-TOY";
while( $mfgs =~ /(.{3})/g ) {
    print $1 =~ s/-// . "\n";
}

How do I do this without adding additional lines? As far I can tell Perl doesn't have a built-in str_replace() function. I could just write one, but as I said, I'm trying to figure out how to do this without additional lines of code.

This is not being used in a real project. This is only being used for learning purposes.



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Can you explain your constraint about not wanting add another line of code? This is obviously trivial to solve if you don't have such a constraint. – Greg Hewgill Jan 1 '12 at 5:59
    
@GregHewgill, No constraint really. Just learning Perl and from what I've seen so far, it just seems like there has to be a simple way to do this. – druciferre Jan 1 '12 at 6:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted
print( do { ( my $x = $1 ) =~ s/-//; $x }, "\n" );
print( ( apply { s/-// } $1 ), "\n" );
say( do { ( my $x = $1 ) =~ s/-//; $x } );  # 5.10+
say( apply { s/-// } $1 );                  # 5.10+
say( $x =~ s/-//r );                        # 5.14+

apply comes from List::MoreUtils.

share|improve this answer
    
@druciferre, The do allows multiple statements, not the declaration of $x. The latter could be done without do. – ikegami Jan 2 '12 at 21:00

Let's take a step back

$mfgs = "AUDBMWCH-FO-TOY";
while( $mfgs =~ /(.{3})/g ) {
    print $1 =~ s/-// . "\n";
}

is simply reading the $mfgs string three characters at a time and removing hyphens.

One could re-write this as the following:

say for map { s|-||r }  $mfgs =~ /.../g ; # Works in Perl 5.14+

use List::MoreUtils 'apply';
say for apply { s|-|| } $mfgs =~ /.../g ; # If that 'r' flag isn't there

or use the transliteration operator (tr///) seeing there is nothing inherently regexy going on:

say for map tr!-!!dr , $mfgs =~ /.../g ;

Both ways would give identical results if there is only up to one hyphen in a block of three characters. This is because tr/-//dr would remove all hyphens, and s/-//r removes only the first occurrence.


That answers how one could do it otherwise, so let's see why it wasn't working before

Why can't $1 be modified?

According to perldoc perlvar (emphasis added):

$<digits> ($1, $2, ...)

Contains the subpattern from the corresponding set of capturing parentheses from the last successful pattern match, not counting patterns matched in nested blocks that have been exited already.

These variables are read-only and dynamically-scoped.

In other words, $1 can't be modified, which is what the s/// was trying to do.

However, a copy of $1 can be modified, which is somewhat covered in Jonathan Leffler's solution.

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I'm not sure why you'd want to do that - the data structure is sub-optimal compared with:

my @mfgs = ( "AUD", "BMW", "CH", "FO", "TOY" );

However, this works:

use strict;
use warnings;
my($mfgs, $x) = ("AUDBMWCH-FO-TOY");
while ($mfgs =~ /(.{3})/g)
{
    printf "%s\n", ($x = $1, $x =~ s/-//, $x);  
}

If you do without strictures or warnings, you can use:

my $mfgs = "AUDBMWCH-FO-TOY";
while ($mfgs =~ /(.{3})/g)
{
    printf "%s\n", ($x = $1, $x =~ s/-//, $x);
}

However, it is better not even to bother learning how you can (ab)use Perl without use strict; and use warnings; (or use diagnostics;) in effect.

share|improve this answer
    
Your third block of code is the best I've seen so far. If it worked when using use strict; then it'd be exactly what I was looking for. – druciferre Jan 1 '12 at 6:37
    
While juggling $x around inside a printf list is cute, it looks rather hazardous and illegible, and is not more efficient than simply doing my $x = $1; $x =~ s/-//g; say $x;. – TLP Jan 1 '12 at 13:57
    
I make no claims of any sort for good style; it is abominable style. It does achieve what the questioner wanted to achieve, and that is its only defense. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 1 '12 at 15:37
    
@JonathanLeffler Granted. However, it might be a good idea to make note of how and why it is not good style, and then provide a solution that is. – TLP Jan 1 '12 at 16:38

In Perl 5.14, there is a new /r modifier available for s/// substitutions (as well as tr////y/// transliterations), which causes the returned result to be a new string, not changing the original.

use 5.014;

$mfgs = "AUDBMWCH-FO-TOY";
while ($mfgs =~ /(.{3})/g) {
    say $1 =~ s/-//r;
}
share|improve this answer

How do I do this without adding additional lines? As far I can tell Perl doesn't have a built-in str_replace() function. I could just write one, but as I said, I'm trying to figure out how to do this without additional lines of code.

Did you read perlfunc? Also, this is not about functions, it's about $1 being a read-only variable. See perldoc perlvar.

$<digits> ($1, $2, ...)

Contains the subpattern from the corresponding set of capturing parentheses from the last successful pattern match, not counting patterns matched in nested blocks that have been exited already.

These variables are read-only and dynamically-scoped.


As near as I can tell, this is the most economic way to achieve the code in question:

tr/-//d, say for $mfgs =~ /.{3}/g;

Or the long version:

my $mfgs = "AUDBMWCH-FO-TOY";
for my $str ($mfgs =~ /.{3}/g) {
    $str =~ tr/-//d;
    say $str;
}

Note that capturing parentheses are not required in this case. From perldoc perlop:

The /g modifier specifies global pattern matching--that is, matching as many times as possible within the string. How it behaves depends on the context. In list context, it returns a list of the substrings matched by any capturing parentheses in the regular expression. If there are no parentheses, it returns a list of all the matched strings, as if there were parentheses around the whole pattern.

Also note the difference between while and for (foreach). while will iterate over the matches as they appear (using /g in scalar context), with implicit use of the \G assertion, but it will not store the match in a variable (except $1). for will extract all the matches at once (using /g in list context), and the match will be aliased in the loop variable ($_ in the first case, my $str in the second).

In scalar context, each execution of m//g finds the next match, returning true if it matches, and false if there is no further match. The position after the last match can be read or set using the pos() function; see pos. A failed match normally resets the search position to the beginning of the string, but you can avoid that by adding the /c modifier (e.g. m//gc). Modifying the target string also resets the search position.

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Unfortunately split doesn't return the same array as $mfgr =~ /.../g. It returns ("", "AUD", "", "BMW", "", "CH-", "", "FO-", "", "TOY") – Zaid Jan 1 '12 at 15:40
    
@Zaid You're right. Not sure what I was thinking there. Day after new years eve. – TLP Jan 1 '12 at 16:30

You could always just do this to get an array of items split by your delimiter..

@a = split("-", $mfgs);

To str_replace you use

$var =~ s/search/replace/g;

Like so

$mfgs =~ s/-/\n/g;
printf("%s\n", $mfgs);
share|improve this answer
    
there is no delimiter in this example, every three characters is what is being used. this is not being used a functional piece of code, it is being used for learning purposes only. – druciferre Jan 1 '12 at 6:24

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