Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have created some code using a node class:

#include <string>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class node
{
    vector<node> children;
    string name;
};

and assume that the data structure has a relatively large size in memory (e.g. 50 MiB) and is unsorted.

Is there any reasonably efficient way for me to sort all the nodes (recursively) based on name other than simply creating a new, sorted tree in memory and then discarding the old copy?

Clarification regarding the sorting:
The vector children is simply to be sorted based on each element's name. Nothing else affects the sorting.

(i.e. this would require me to swap two objects without deep-copying them -- is this possible in C++03 and earlier? How about later?)

share|improve this question
2  
Of course there is. Write a function that does that. What's the problem exactly? –  littleadv Jan 1 '12 at 6:12
4  
If I recall correctly, the type you pass to std::vector must be complete. node is not a complete type until the class definition is finished. Usually with tree structures you would have a vector<node*> children or make it a binary tree with each node holding a "left" and "right" node pointers. –  In silico Jan 1 '12 at 6:12
    
@Insilico: Huh? –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '12 at 6:13
1  
@Mehrdad: It may work but it isn't standard, AFAIK. I might be wrong, but even as of C++11 the effects are undefined if you pass in an incomplete type unless the class explicitly allows it, and I don't think std::vectors are one of them. If this weren't an issue there wouldn't be a Boost library for it in the first place! –  In silico Jan 1 '12 at 6:20
2  
@Mehrdad, can you clarify the question. I think I can think of a number of different interpretations. Interpretation 1: You mentioned 'levels'. The root node is level 0, the children of the root are level 1, the grandchildren are level 2, and so on. Do you wish each level to be treated independently of the other levels, and all the nodes in that level to be sorted? Interpretation 2: Sort the children of each node; in particular, each child will have the same parent it had before the sort. And each parent will have the same children, just in a different order. .. to be continued .. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 1 '12 at 12:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(i.e. this would require me to swap two objects without deep-copying them -- is this possible in C++03 and earlier? How about later?)

std::swap is a Standard function. All Standard types provide a swap operation as a member function. swap is very common and necessary for all kinds of algorithms. The Standard std::sort will use swap to swap the nodes, so you don't have to deepcopy. You merely need to implement swap().

class node
{
    vector<node> children;
    string name;
    void swap(node& other) {
        name.swap(other.name);
        children.swap(other.children);
    }
    void sort() {
        std::sort(children.begin(), children.end(), [&](const node& lhs, const node& rhs) {
            return lhs.name < rhs.name;
        });
        std::for_each(children.begin(), children.end(), [&](node& child) {
            child.sort();
        });
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow, didn't know that. I'll give it a try, thanks! +1 –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '12 at 16:08
    
My swap is never getting called through sort. I'm on VC++ 2008. Ideas? –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '12 at 16:20
1  
@Mehrdad: Try specializing std::swap instead or defining your own free function swap in the global namespace. –  Puppy Jan 1 '12 at 17:13
    
Ah that works, thanks! –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '12 at 18:25

Although I think in silico is correct (i.e. std::vector<T> can't be a member of T because T is incomplete), let's ignore this for now. Instead, I guess your question is about how to move the object: as is,

std::sort(children.begin(), children.end(),
               predicate);

(with a suitable predicate) would exchange the positions of two nodes by std::swap()ing them. This would create a deep copy and two deep copying assignments. The easy fix is to make std::sort() use a custom swap function which just swaps the children vectors:

class node {
    ...
public:
    void swap(node& other) {
        this->name.swap(other.name);
        this->children.swap(other.children);
    };

void swap(node& n0, node& n1) {
    n0.swap(n1);
}

In general, for value types using allocation (directly or indirectly) you probably want to implement a swap() function. Since it isn't needed for the correct behavior it is something often added later to get better performance.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you forgot to swap the string name? –  Aaron McDaid Jan 1 '12 at 13:02
    
er, yes... I forgot about it with swapping the nodes being way more expensive. correcting... –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 1 '12 at 14:20

You can recursively traverse the tree and use std::sort() on each node to reorder the nodes. See the sort() method I have added to node.

#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

class node
{
    typedef node storage_t;
    typedef std::vector<storage_t> children_t;
    children_t children;
    std::string name;

    struct by_name_fn {
        bool operator()(node const& lhs, node const& rhs) const
        {
            return lhs.name < rhs.name;
        }

        bool operator()(node const* lhs, node const* rhs) const
        {
            return lhs->name < rhs->name;
        }
    };

    void sort()
    {
        std::sort(children.begin(), children.end(), by_name_fn());
        typedef children_t::iterator iter_t;
        for (iter_t i = children.begin(), e = children.end(); i != e; ++i) {
            (*i).sort();
        }
    }
};

This will, however, do lots of copy operations. So you will probably need to change the structure of node to contain by reference rather than by value its children. That is adjust the typedef of storage_t to be either node* or some shared pointer based on what suits the rest of your program. You will also need to change the line (*i).sort() to (*i)->sort().

share|improve this answer
    
Why the ugly pointless typedefs? –  Puppy Jan 1 '12 at 12:01
    
Habits of an old man @DeadMG. The storage_t and children_t are to separate interface from implementation. You can change how the nodes are stored by touching fewer lines. The iter_t typedef is just to keep the line short. You know 80 character terminals and all. I realise some of this will be mitigated by moving to C++11 but for the moment I am still stuck with C++03. –  Bowie Owens Jan 1 '12 at 12:25
    
@BowieOwens: The entire point of the question was how to avoid the "lots of copy operations" part using this data structure. Telling me to change the data structure and ignoring the constraint is kinda ignoring the question. –  Mehrdad Jan 1 '12 at 16:07
    
You didn't stipulate that the data-structure was not up for change. Adding a layer of indirection is a often a useful technique to avoid copying. I will endeavour to ignore you questions from now on if that helps. –  Bowie Owens Jan 2 '12 at 2:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.