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I'm trying to figure out how to isolate all lines with semicolons if they do not contain colons for further regex work. Right now I am using a work around because all the lines that do not contain semicolons or colons also contain a bracket "(". So, I'm just ignoring any line that contains a bracket. The code I have actually doesn't work:

<?php
$filename = "fakexample.txt";
$file = fopen($filename, "rb");
$myFile = fread($file, filesize($filename));

function get_lines($string, $myFile){
  preg_match_all("/$string/m", $myFile, $matches);
  return $matches;
}

$string = "^((?!:|\().)*$";
$list = get_lines($string, $myFile);

foreach($list[1] as $list){
  echo $list."\n";
}
?>

I'm worried that this may not be PHP syntax? Possibly why it isn't working?

The output I get is: d.

The input:

vulture (wing)
tabulations: one leg; two legs; flying
father; master; patriarch    
mat (box)
pedistal; blockade; pilar
animal belly (oval)
old style: naval
jackal's belly; jester
slope of hill (arch)
key; visible; enlightened
share|improve this question
    
Split the lines, iterate over them and filter the tabulations: case (preg_grep()) and only then do the splitting. –  mario Jan 1 '12 at 10:49
    
@Mario, I have something like that I am working on, here: pastebin.com/CM4bPReb. I'm not sure how close I am, though. Still troubleshooting syntax errors. –  Wolfpack'08 Jan 1 '12 at 10:53
    
@Mario, Still working on it... pastebin.com/0Q3ypavr –  Wolfpack'08 Jan 1 '12 at 12:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This might do the trick:

<?php
$filename = "fakexample.txt";
$file = fopen($filename, "rb");
$myFile = fread($file, filesize($filename));

function get_lines($string, $myFile){
  if (preg_match_all("/$string/m", $myFile, $matches))
    return $matches[0];
  else return array();
}

// Match lines with ; but no :
$string = '^[^;:\r\n]*;[^:\r\n]*$';
$lines = get_lines($string, $myFile);

foreach($lines as $line){
  echo $line."\n";
}
?>

Additional:

Here is a breakdown of the above regex, which meets the precise original requirements stated in the question: i.e. "... isolate all lines with semicolons if they do not contain colons ..."

$re = '/ # Match line with ; but no :
    ^           # Anchor to start of line.
    [^;:\r\n]*  # Zero or more non-:, non-;
    ;           # Match one ; (minimum required).
    [^:\r\n]*   # Zero or more non-:.
    $           # Anchor to end of line.
    /xm';

But since you insist on using the expression: '^((?!(:|\()).)*$', it appears that what you really want is to match are: " lines having no colons and no left parentheses." (which is what that expression does). (You probably already understand it but I always like to write expressions fully commented - can't help myself!) So here it is broken down:

$re = '/ # Match line with no colons or left parentheses.
    ^           # Anchor to start of line.
    (           # Step through line one-char at a time.
      (?!       # Assert that this char is NOT...
        (:|\()  # either a colon or a left paren.
      )         # End negative lookahead.
      .         # Safe to match next non-newline char.
    )*          # Step through line one-char at a time.
    $           # Anchor to end of line.
    /xm';

If that is what you really want, fine. But if this is the case then the above expression can be greatly simplified (and sped up) as:

$re = '/ # Match line with no colons or left parentheses.
    ^           # Anchor to start of line.
    [^:(\r\n]*  # Zero or more non-:, non-(, non-EOL.
    $           # Anchor to end of line.
    /xm';

And just for the sake of completeness, if what you really, really need is to match are lines "having at least one semicolon but no colons or left parentheses" Then this one will do that:

$re = '/ # Match line with ; but no : or (
    ^            # Anchor to start of line.
    [^;:(\r\n]*  # Zero or more non-:, non-;, non-(.
    ;            # Match one ; (minimum required).
    [^:(\r\n]*   # Zero or more non-:, non-(.
    $           # Anchor to end of line.
    /xm';

When working with regex is extremely important to precisely define the requirements up front in the question. Regular expressions are a very precise language and they will only do what is asked of them.

I hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, Ridgerunner, your icon is sick. –  Wolfpack'08 Jan 2 '12 at 3:09
    
Could you explain the regex, ridge? You're dead close. The last line of semicolon-separated values is arrayized by this code, but the first three lines of semicolon-separated values are not. So, the missing part: father, master, patriarch, pedistal, blockade, pilar, jackal's belly, jester. The part captured: key; visible; enlightened –  Wolfpack'08 Jan 2 '12 at 3:13
    
Oh hey. We got it. Switch the regex in $string to ^((?!(:|\()).)*$. The issue I was having wasn't with the regex itself. It was with the surrounding PHP used to print everything out. I would like to understand regex better, though. I'm reading the manual over and over, trying to remember it. Thanks, bro. Giving you the golden green diving combat wing. –  Wolfpack'08 Jan 2 '12 at 3:49
    
I've updated the answer to hopefully meet your requirements. –  ridgerunner Jan 2 '12 at 4:44
1  
Yes, its best to think through the question you wish to ask and then carefully word it so there is no ambiguity (and don't go changing it midstream! - people spend time answering what you ask). Make it specific and provide example input and desired output. It sounds as though what you are really after is to parse comma/semicolon separated values (CSV). If so, do a search for: "parse CSV" (this gets asked a lot). I have another answer you might want to look at that shows what you are up against. See: How can I parse a CSV string with Javascript?. –  ridgerunner Jan 2 '12 at 16:36

(?<=;|^)[^;]*(?=;)|(?<=;)[^;]*(?=;|$)

That should work, although that will match empty strings such as the one between ;;, if you don't want this behaviour, just change the asterisks to plus signs.

share|improve this answer
1  
Did you put slashes around it? –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Jan 1 '12 at 7:23
1  
Ruby does not support lookbehind (i.e. (?<=)). Your question is tagged PHP. The regex works in a PHP regex tester such as this one. –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Jan 1 '12 at 7:28
1  
If you're looking to run this regex in multi-line mode (i.e. putting an m right at the end of your regex, after the last slash) then this regex should work for picking out everything delimited by semicolons but not lines without semicolons: (?<=;)[^;]*?(?=;|$)|(?<=;|^)[^;]*?(?=;). –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Jan 1 '12 at 7:54
1  
Yeah, array index 0 indicates everything that was matched. Array index 1 -- if present -- will indicate everything that matched the first parenthesized subpattern. It's also important that you add m to the end of your regex after the last slash to enable multi-line mode. See this screenshot. –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Jan 1 '12 at 8:43
1  
So whet exacly you want? Commas, colons, semicolos? I'm little confused here. Do you want filter those lines so there are only lines with semicolon but without colon? –  piotrekkr Jan 1 '12 at 10:57

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