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In my following code, I have defined more specific rule for h1 as #inner h1 and less specific rule as #container h1 is also defined. But if #container h1 is put after #inner h1 then it takes effect and #inner h1 is ignored while it shouldn't be because its more specific.

Please help me in understanding the issue.

CSS:

#inner h1 { font-size:25px; }
#container h1 { font-size:15px; }

HTML:

<div id="container">
  <div id="inner">
    <h1>Hello World!</h1>   
  </div>
</div>
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3  
No, #inner h1 is not more specific than #container h1. They both have a specificity of 101 (I believe, htmldog.com/guides/cssadvanced/specificity). Just because an element is INSIDE another element doesn't make the one inside be more specific. –  Charlie Jan 1 '12 at 6:48
1  
@Charlie: Note that it's not literally one hundred and one - 11 class selectors, for example, won't override a single ID selector. It's more like one-zero-one. –  BoltClock Jan 1 '12 at 6:50
    
Thanks for the clarification –  Charlie Jan 1 '12 at 7:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It might be that your idea of specificity is a little off. Specificity has to be a context-free idea: since CSS can be loaded independently of HTML, you must not need an HTML document to guess which rule is more "specific". Consider this other valid example:

<div id="inner">
  <div id="container">
    <h1>Hello World!</h1>   
  </div>
</div>

With this snippet, you would have to go against your initial guess that inner should be more specific. This means that your interpretation required context (which CSS does not have).

The point is, both rules are seen with equal specificity (h1 descendants of an element identified by an id), and the selector doesn't give higher priority to closer descendants.

In case two rules of equal specificity apply, the winner is the last one declared in the CSS.

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Good explanation –  grc Jan 1 '12 at 6:44
    
Another thing: combinators don't contribute to specificity at all, so swapping the space for a > won't affect which rule takes precedence, because both combinators are of no specificity. See this question –  BoltClock Jan 1 '12 at 6:59

Those both have the same specificity and as you note, the order they appear in the style sheet is the determining factor for which style rules are applied.

There are a variety of ways you could structure the rules to gain more specificity but in general I'd stay away from the !important modifier.

For more information see 6.4.3 Calculating a selector's specificity in the W3's CSS spec.

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Isn't #inner h1 more specific? –  Shawn Taylor Jan 1 '12 at 6:41
1  
There's also a helpful article on selector specificity (there was a question similar to this yesterday), htmldog.com/guides/cssadvanced/specificity –  Charlie Jan 1 '12 at 6:43
1  
@ShawnTaylor no, those two have the same specificity. –  steveax Jan 1 '12 at 6:46

this is not an issue at all :) CSS parses classes one after another and the last rule overrides previous, of course if the previous is not more specific or does not include !important statements in it, you can put font-size: 25px !important; in the first so that it overrides the last rule, otherwise just change places of classes

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Classes? What classes? –  grc Jan 1 '12 at 6:37
    
Isn't #inner h1 more specific? –  Shawn Taylor Jan 1 '12 at 6:41
    
@grc, css classes lol –  Mr. BeatMasta Jan 1 '12 at 7:00
    
@Shawn, they're equal both in length and selectors themselves, if you had div#inner h1 that would be more specific –  Mr. BeatMasta Jan 1 '12 at 7:01
    
@Mr. BeatMasta, I know but I didn't think that this question had anything to do with classes. –  grc Jan 1 '12 at 7:01

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