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<?php
function f(& $var){$var = rand(); return $var;}
echo f($var ="a_").'<br/>'; /* outpu a random number */
echo $var.'<br/>'; /*but don't change global variables, it still is "1<br/>", no the same like up line */
echo f($var).'<br/>'; /* outpu a random number */
echo $var.'<br/>'; /* haved change, the same like up line */
?>

run up code and output text like under block

28486
a_
25863
25863

Wwhy can't change the $var in the first call?

<?php
function f(& $var, & $isRefer){$var = rand(); global $gVar; var_dump(array('are they same?' => $isRefer === $gVar)); return $var;}
$gVar = 'global var';
echo f($var ="a_", $gVar = & $gVar).'<br/>'; /* outpu a random number */
echo $var.'<br/>'; /*but don't change global variables, it still is "1<br/>", no the same like up line */
echo f($var, $gVar).'<br/>'; /* outpu a random number */
echo $var.'<br/>'; /* haved change, the same like up line */
?>

-the code output like-

array(1) { ["are they same?"]=> bool(true) } 14802 a_ array(1) { ["are they same?"]=> bool(true) } 19107 19107

so i think it is pass value like f($var = 'd') by "refer"

share|improve this question
8  
Say whaaaaaaaaat –  Christian Jonassen Jan 1 '12 at 12:24
2  
You know, this might be interesting, and you might have a real issue there. But the presentation is not usable. You need to cut out one actual example, and showcase one variable output pair. Nobody can follow that as one big code and var_dump blob otherwise. –  mario Jan 1 '12 at 12:56
    
I'm stuck on a title, but after editing I'd say this question is alright for reopening. –  Bojangles Jan 1 '12 at 13:37
1  
f($var ="1<br/>"); is executing the assignment of $var ="1<br/>" but it isn't passing $var to the function, but the result of that assignment... so $var remains unchanged. –  Mark Baker Jan 1 '12 at 13:38
1  
Now I'm regretting reopening this question. How on Earth is anyone supposed to read your copy-pasta comment? –  Bojangles Jan 1 '12 at 14:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Passing variables by reference is a special case of function calling. Typically only the value of an expression is passed into the function as parameter.

f(3 * 4);

Here 3 * 4 is an expression that evaluates to 12, so 12 is passed into the function. A function that expects variables to be passed by reference though is different, because it needs a variable:

function f(&$var) { ... }

The purpose of passing by reference is to be able to modify the passed variable, not just a value. As such, you need to actually pass it a variable, not just a value. Calling the function with something like f(3 * 7) doesn't make much sense in this case. Well, f($var = 'foo') is the same thing. $var = 'foo' is an expression, it's not simply a variable. Therefore only the result of the expression (the value) is passed, not any variable that happens to appear in the expression.

To illustrate that better, which variable should be passed when doing f($foo + $bar)? The answer is that it just doesn't work that way. To pass a variable by reference, you can only use a variable as the parameter, not an expression.

f($var);
share|improve this answer
    
ok,i know now,it is copy.function f(& $var, & $isRefer){$var = rand(); $isRefer='kkkkk'; global $gVar;var_dump($gVar);...;thanks all of every one!! –  qidizi Jan 1 '12 at 14:48
    
Just for the love of god, don't write code like this. Pointless pass-by-reference and global in the same function is too many sins at once. Pass-by-reference has its uses, but you hardly ever need it. It's mostly a performance tweak for things like shuffle(&$array). Don't overuse it! –  deceze Jan 1 '12 at 14:54
    
Nicely expressed deceze: you've managed to translate into English what I was struggling to say –  Mark Baker Jan 2 '12 at 11:20
f($var ="a_");

does not pass $var as an argument to f(), but passes the result of that assignment to f()... This is an unassigned string value equal to the string that you have assigned tp $var (assuming that the assignment was successful), but isn't a reference to $var itself. That's why $var is assigned, but isn't changed by f()

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This question confuses me.

So this is your initial code:

<?php
function f(& $var){
    $var = rand();
    return $var;
}
echo f($var ="a_").'<br/>'; /* outpu a random number */
echo $var.'<br/>'; /*but don't change global variables, it still is "1<br/>", no the same like up line */
echo f($var).'<br/>'; /* outpu a random number */
echo $var.'<br/>'; /* haved change, the same like up line */
?>

In your function it doesn't matter what I pass to it, because the second line $var = rand(); is ALWAYS going to overwrite whatever value you pass to the function.

So if I did f("jordanmoore"); after the first line this would no longer be "jordanmoore," rather it would be a random value.

Next is this line: echo f($var ="a_").'<br/>'; /* outpu a random number */

I'm not sure why you are trying to set $var here. If you want to pass "a_" to the function then just call f("a_");. But I'm not sure why you're passing anything to the function when the value is always overwritten. If you want the format to be "a_somerandomnumber" then perhaps echo "a_".f(null); would be better to use?

I'm going to hesitate a guess here and rewrite your function to the following

<?php
function f(& $var=null){
    $var = rand();
    return $var;
}
?>

Then you may use it like so:

<?php
function f(& $var=null){
    $var = rand();
    return $var;
}

echo f(); //output a random number
echo "a_".f(); //out put a_ with a random number after the underscore
$myRandomVariable = f(); //put a random number in a variable
echo $myRandomVariable; //echo this variable
echo "a_".$myRandomVariable; //echo this variable after a_
echo "a_$myRandomVariable"; //same as above
?>

Hope this helps.

edit

You can also then do:

<?php
function f(& $var=null){
    $var = rand();
    return $var;
}
$myValue = 0;
f($myValue); //store a random number in "$myValue"
echo $myValue; //echo the random number
?>
share|improve this answer
    
i can write a economic code,but i don't understand how they do : f($var = 'e') and function f(& $var) –  qidizi Jan 1 '12 at 14:25
    
I don't understand what you're trying to do with f($var = 'e') because this is a statement. $var = 'e' will execute first and then your line of code turns in to f(true); because it completed successfully. In the other line function f(& $var); the ampersand character & is being used so that $var can be written to instead of just being read. The edit part of my answer demonstrates what the & part of function f(& $var); does. –  user873578 Jan 1 '12 at 14:31
2  
FYI: $var = 'e' evaluates to 'e', not true. –  deceze Jan 1 '12 at 14:34

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