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I'm trying to construct an antlr grammar to parse a templating language. that language can be embedded in any text and the boundaries are marked with opening/closing tags: {{ / }}. So a valid template looks like this:

    foo {{ someVariable }} bar

Where foo and bar should be ignored, and the part inside the {{ and }} tags should be parsed. I've found this question which basically has an answer for the problem, except that the tags are only one { and }. I've tried to modify the grammar to match 2 opening/closing characters, but as soon as i do this, the BUFFER rule consumes ALL characters, also the opening and closing brackets. The LD rule is never being invoked.

Has anyone an idea why the antlr lexer is consuming all tokens in the Buffer rule when the delimiters have 2 characters, but does not consume the delimiters when they have only one character?

    grammar Test;

    options { 
      output=AST;
      ASTLabelType=CommonTree; 
    }

    @lexer::members {
      private boolean insideTag = false;
    }

    start   
      :  (tag | BUFFER )*
      ;

    tag
      : LD IDENT^ RD
      ;

    LD @after {
      // flip lexer the state
      insideTag=true;
      System.err.println("FLIPPING TAG");
    } : '{{';

    RD @after {
      // flip the state back
      insideTag=false;
    } : '}}';

    SPACE    : (' ' | '\t' | '\r' | '\n') {$channel=HIDDEN;};
    IDENT    : (LETTER)*;
    BUFFER   : { !insideTag }?=> ~(LD | RD)+;

    fragment LETTER : ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z');
share|improve this question
    
Beware that IDENT : (LETTER)*; (might) cause the lexer to go in an infinite loop. Lexer rule must always match at least 1 character. –  Bart Kiers Jan 1 '12 at 16:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can match any character once or more until you see {{ ahead by including a predicate inside the parenthesis ( ... )+ (see the BUFFER rule in the demo).

A demo:

grammar Test;

options { 
  output=AST;
  ASTLabelType=CommonTree; 
}

@lexer::members {
  private boolean insideTag = false;
}

start   
  :  tag EOF
  ;

tag
  : LD IDENT^ RD
  ;

LD 
@after {insideTag=true;} 
 : '{{'
 ;

RD 
@after {insideTag=false;} 
 : '}}'
 ;

BUFFER
 : ({!insideTag && !(input.LA(1)=='{' && input.LA(2)=='{')}?=> .)+ {$channel=HIDDEN;}
 ;

SPACE 
 : (' ' | '\t' | '\r' | '\n') {$channel=HIDDEN;}
 ;

IDENT
 : ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+
 ;

Note that it's best to keep the BUFFER rule as the first lexer rule in your grammar: that way, it will be the first token that is tried.

If you now parse "foo {{ someVariable }} bar", the following AST is created:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot for your explantation. it works perfectly now. –  pulse00 Jan 1 '12 at 17:56
    
You're welcome @RobertGruendler. –  Bart Kiers Jan 1 '12 at 18:01

Wouldn't a grammar like this fit your needs? I don't see why the BUFFER needs to be that complicated.

grammar test;

options { 
  output=AST;
  ASTLabelType=CommonTree; 
}

@lexer::members { 
    private boolean inTag=false;
}

start   
  :  tag* EOF
  ;

tag
  : LD IDENT RD -> IDENT
  ;

LD 
@after { inTag=true; }
 : '{{'
 ;

RD 
@after { inTag=false; }
 : '}}'
 ;

IDENT   :   {inTag}?=> ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'_') 'a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'0'..'9'|'_')*
    ;

BUFFER
 : . {$channel=HIDDEN;}
 ;
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