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My master's thesis is to look at how to apply agile.

There is an awful lot of corporate selling of agile - lots of management consultants selling their brand as 'best'.

I'm not interested whether XP, Scrum, Crystal Clear, Agile-CMMI, Six Sigma or any other brand/variant is best. I'm interested in what real, active developers (i.e. you guys) actually apply as agile.

What I've investigated is how to tailor agile to different organisational requirements.

From research into how different organisations apply agile I've developed the following guidelines - a recipe for what agile variations should be applied in what situations:

  • Larger and more distributed or more flexible teams need stricter coding and testing standards, small teams can (and should) use less.
  • Process documentation should be minimal, real-time and current.
  • Detailed statistical control indicators are an unnecessary overhead: early release of incomplete software is a better indication of progress.
  • Ideally developers should be close to the customer with no specialised intermediate roles. Additional roles should only be used if customers are specialised in a way that stops developers from also being users.
  • Iterations should be flexible unless it benefits coordination of releases with other departments or other processes.
  • Developers should be able to easily and regularly communicate but meetings should be infrequent (monthly and weekly, rather than daily).
  • Pair programming should only be used for training and investigational tasks.
  • These guidelines are a starting point only: continuous improvement should be used to further tailor the agile variant to the exact circumstances.

These factors change when applied in an organisation with existing traditional (i.e. BDUF or waterfall) models, where agile teams must either coexist with or be adapted from teams using non-agile methods:

  • Process documentation with sign off and structured steps will help other teams track the project.
  • Statistical indicators (like velocity) can help reassure non-agile teams that the process is under control.
  • Fixed iterations will help co-ordination across teams.

These additional guidelines will help agile co-exist with traditional models, but they provide additional overhead and restrictions.

What I want to know is what you - the people who write software, not agile consultants - think of this framework.

What do you think is accurate? What do you think is wrong? What would you change? What have I missed?

Most importantly: why?


I've added a bounty to this to offer an extra incentive to answer what is a rather long question. The bounty will go to whoever gets the most votes from the SO community - I realise that there's no single right answer, but I'm interested in what's closest to the community's consensus.

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I have to admit I'm not sure about the etiquette here about homework questions. Granted that a Masters thesis is more worthy than Monday's homework, I still see a relationship here. That, and the fact that this is a survey question bother me. Not enough to vote to close, but if someone has links to help me make these decisions in the future, I'd like to know. Maybe no homework or Masters theses, but a PhD thesis might be ok. –  John Saunders May 15 '09 at 15:39
    
This isn't a survey question - it's far too open. This is actually taken from my conclusion - the research (based on academic and community sources) is complete and this model is the result. What I'm looking for is community feedback in order to critically reflect on my model. I figure there's high value in peer feedback rather than my own analysis of my own conclusions. –  Keith May 15 '09 at 15:44
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Section two of stackoverflow.com/faq: "Avoid asking questions that are subjective, argumentative, or require extended discussion. This is not a discussion board, this is a place for questions that can be answered!". "Looking for community feedback" sounds a lot like "extended discussion". You've clarified it for me, and I'm voting to close as "not a real question" since it is not a "question that can be answered". –  John Saunders May 15 '09 at 15:54
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@John - fair enough, thanks for the feedback anyway. I think there is a place on SO for open questions like this. There isn't one definitive answer here, but all the responses have the potential to add value to what is (after all) a programming related issue. –  Keith May 15 '09 at 17:44
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@John - I agree with Keith. I also think Jeff A. would ultimately agree that the we the community ultimately own and decide what's best. I find a question/discussion like this quite valuable. –  JP Richardson May 19 '09 at 15:14

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+400
  • Larger and more distributed or more flexible teams need stricter coding and testing standards, small teams can (and should) use less.
  • Process documentation should be minimal, real-time and current.
  • Detailed statistical control indicators are an unnecessary overhead: early release of incomplete software is a better indication of progress.
  • Ideally developers should be close to the customer with no specialised intermediate roles. Additional roles should only be used if customers are specialised in a way that stops developers from also being users.
  • Iterations should be flexible unless it benefits coordination of releases with other departments or other processes.
  • Developers should be able to easily and regularly communicate but meetings should be infrequent (monthly and weekly, rather than daily).
  • Pair programming should only be used for training and investigational tasks.
  • These guidelines are a starting point only: continuous improvement should be used to further tailor the agile variant to the exact circumstances.

Coding / Testing standards IMO need to be implemented regardless of the size and distribution of the team. Having coding / testing standards leads to more managable / stable code.

I agree with documentation. By using some Clean Code practices such as meaningfull comments and intent revealing naming conventions in your code then you remove some of the need for documentation of the code itself. Documentation should be at the business level and I prefer it to be in the form of Acceptance Tests.

While having developers close to the customer improves with the iteration process, you need to protect the developer from the business circomventing the process by coming directly to the developer for additions/changes/scope creep. The Business still needs to follow the process through backlog grooming/prioritization etc.

By using release iterations along with development iterations you can maintain a flexible schedule of your iterations that works for the team. Currently we work on 1 week sprint iterations with a release sprint every 3 to 4 weeks.

The type of the meeting should dictate the frequency of the meeting. Daily standups need to be daily. They provide accountablity and transparency to the team which is vital in having a successful team. Retrospectives need to happen at the end of each iteration and that frequency is dictated by the size of your iteration. Other meetings such as code reviews, demo's should never be dictated on time but rather on need and completion.

Pair programming should never be nailed down to specific types. We do pair programming with our QA Testers, our BA team so that both sides have a better understanding of the UAT's and Stories. We also do pair programming for knowledge share, prototyping, investigational tasks etc. In our environment pair programming has become second nature.

Continuous improvement in Agile will become second hand nature as you learn to modify the practices of Agile to your business needs. So long as you don't stray from the Manifesto your Agile should be successful.

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Thanks for the feedback David - I particularly like your point about protection from feature creep and pair-programming with QA and the like. How much of your time to you estimate you spend pair-programming? I agree on the coding standards but, in a small team with regular refactoring, is it really worth the overhead to have those standards enforced pre-commit? My point (which could do with more clarity) is that the coding standards should be less enforced. –  Keith May 18 '09 at 19:47
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Myself I would say I spend probably about 30% of my time pair programming as the tech lead. I've got 2 that work on my team that spend in the upwards of probably about 50 - 60% pairing, so it really depends upon the situation. As for coding standards, how we handle them are more along the line of guides. We don't have any measures/threasholds that we validate against in a pre-commit or in a builds. –  David Yancey May 19 '09 at 2:40
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We use guides/standards in our environment more for consistency/readabilty/managability. What I look for in code are good clean code practices being followed such as meaningful comments, intent revealing naming conventions, proper error trapping/handling, attempts to follow SRP. I agree that stringent standards in a smaller team can be hindering to a point, but I also feel that regardless of the team size / environment that there needs to be some guide or standard for code to be established. –  David Yancey May 19 '09 at 2:43
    
QA and testing strategy should be coupled with criticality of the system. Smaller and less critical system, you don't need as strict and formal testing plans. That does not mean write less manageable code. QA process can often times create unnecessary bottlenecks. Everything should really hinge on the type of product and project... not written in stone. –  sam yi Apr 16 '13 at 18:51
    
Agile really works poorly if there are multiple products in play. It works best when a "scrum" team is working on a single product... even if it's on various part/projects within that product. Scrum implies means everyone is pulling in the same direction, however, that's difficult to do when everyone is doing their own thing. –  sam yi Apr 16 '13 at 18:55

The last two points I have a small problem with. Daily stand up meetings are very beneficial. It lets us go over what we worked on the previous day, and what we intend to work on until the next meeting (tomorrow). It is important to note that daily standup meetings should be kept short and to the point. We got into a situation where some people enjoyed bringing up all sorts of questions about the project, so we decided that no questions can be asked, only productivity statements. If there are questions, a further meeting is scheduled with the person in charge of that component.

Also, pair programming should not be used JUST for training and investigational tasks. Pair programming has many benefits, such as knowledge sharing/transfer and code ownership. Two minds on one problem can bring out many interesting points of views and can help isolate potential design flaws. In my opinion, pair programming is underrated and most selfish programmers do not like pair programming. It is a benefit to the project and the team, not to one's self. Good software is written by collaborative teams, not one nerd.

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Thanks for the feedback - I realise that those are pretty controversial points. They're the key traits of Scrum (daily stand-ups) and XP (pair-programming). I made those assertions based on real world applications: few organisations use pair-programming extensively and both Microsoft and Google use it no more than 5% of the time (Google's info from Yegge's interview on the SO podcast). I'd be really interested in some real world citations of extensive pair-programming use (outside of XP) ideally linked to why pair-programming works for them and not at other companies. –  Keith May 15 '09 at 18:22
    
Daily stand-ups have proven really useful at some companies, for instance Microsoft. At others (like 37signals and Google) they were found to be too much lost time for the potential gains. I've linked their use in my thesis to co-ordination with other teams and non-agile departments. –  Keith May 15 '09 at 18:24
    
I'm not questioning whether pair-programming and daily stand-ups are efficacious. My research aims are to identify when they should be used and when they shouldn't. –  Keith May 15 '09 at 18:25
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In my experience we used pair programming to share knowledge between architectural components. It is common to be working on UI extensively one week and the backend the next week. Each component has a lead developer, but they too rotate to other components, to share knowledge. Programmers are human and can be absent from work and someone must fill that void. Pair programming is an excellent resource for small enterprise teams. I enjoy learning all aspects, it helps improve my weak points (like UI). –  D3vtr0n May 15 '09 at 19:08
    
Thanks for the clarification, I guess my question is really: what's different at your organisation that makes pair-programming work for you when it doesn't work at other places? Do you still find pair-programming effective when you're doing mundane tasks? –  Keith May 18 '09 at 13:14

As part of your PhD thesis, you should also consider how Agile is used across teams that are placed in different parts on the globe. So, if you have a product team on the east coast, development teams in India and Russia, QA team in Singapore and so on and so forth. This to me is a whole different ball game and needs completely different patterns.

For example, some of the patterns are:

  1. Based on the time zone, pair the early risers in one part of the world with late nighters of the other part or vice-versa. This is not exactly pair programming but you can call this whatever pattern you want.

  2. Emphasis must be to make the code as readable as possible as opposed to writable. What this means is we may have to put emphasis on uniform design patterns and fluent like naming.

  3. Create teams in such a way that you have one of them and one of us. Which means you pair the Russsian developer with the Indian developer and they work together on a module.

Inventing your own patterns over time that make agile work is really fun and takes a lot of patience and hardwork.

Hope this new angle helps you in some way.

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Thanks, that's an interesting avenue for further research. –  Keith May 22 '09 at 7:41

Oh, boy. Good luck.

I like your approach, especially getting input from us grunts rather than the gold-watch powerpoint set.

I would say that any such approach needs to be adaptable to the specific circumstances. Nobody should do something only because somebody else said they should. Thinking for oneself should always be at the forefront, IMHO.

It's been a while since I worked with Sloan School MBAs, but I got the clear sense that they had been taught that programmers were to be "managed", rather than "cultivated". That we were something of a disagreeable commodity, rather than full team members. I hope you have a better experience than that.

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I agree with your points here (see my basic management theory is.gd/AdID) - I think agile is always a bottom-up evolving process. My research question is what should you start with? I mean - it's taken my team about 4 years to get from an initial Scrum model to the highly customised one that we have now, and I don't think the variant we've come up with is a one size fits all. –  Keith May 15 '09 at 19:41

We practice agile in a large company with highly integrated software and pre-determined windows when software can be deploy to production on shared hardware environments.

We developed a set of agile practices composed of SCRUM (project management) practices and XP (engineering) practices. Many of the systems we deploy with make use of traditional waterfall processes

Regarding your framework I will reply to each item:

"Larger and more distributed or more flexible teams need stricter coding and testing standards, small teams can (and should) use less."

If by coding and testing standards you mean engineering practices (XP) such as continuous integration, pair programming, test driven development, automated functional and performance testing etc. we employee all the same practices regardless of the size of the team or project. As a result, we often release software with zero defects found during User Acceptance Test. Releasing high quality software (low defects) that remains malleable to enable continuous development at a sustainable pace drives the need for engineering practices, not the size of the organization.

"Process documentation should be minimal, real-time and current."

If by process documentation you mean the agile process documentation, all of our fits on a wall. We show the manifesto, the mapping to the 12 principles and finally the 21 practices we employee. The fact that they fit on the wall and they are highly visible enables the team to understand them and more importantly actually put them into practice.

"Detailed statistical control indicators are an unnecessary overhead: early release of incomplete software is a better indication of progress."

Percent completes on traditional work work artifacts carry little value. Demoing working software to our product owner/ business partner every two week is the best indicator of progress. Tracking actual velocity (units of story cards completed) and defect rates and displaying the data on big visible charts is very helpful. When introducing certain practices to a team it is useful to show progress. For example, the number of unit test written before the code when learning TDD.

"Ideally developers should be close to the customer with no specialised intermediate roles. Additional roles should only be used if customers are specialised in a way that stops developers from also being users."

Users, if possible, should work with the team in the open workspace. If it is not possible for the user to be with the team then a user proxy is the next best person to be on the line. No one can give better feedback than the people that will actually use the software to do their jobs.

"Iterations should be flexible unless it benefits coordination of releases with other departments or other processes."

More importantly, release dates should be alined across teams. Iterations are best if kept consistent in duration (we use every 2 weeks). Consistent length of iteration is consistent with time boxing and the calculation of velocity used to commit to story cards for the next iteration.

"Developers should be able to easily and regularly communicate but meetings should be infrequent (monthly and weekly, rather than daily)."

The team should participate in the daily stand up meeting, and every iteration the iteration planning meeting, the show & tell meeting, planning poker meeting and the retrospective meeting. Every release the team participates in the release planning meeting. Given that the user/ business partner works with the line, daily conversation can occur about the work being completed.

"Pair programming should only be used for training and investigational tasks."

The first reason to use Pair Programming is to eliminate defects. I have written a number of response regarding pair programming. To summarize, pairs less likely to become blocked, less likely to take email or web vacations, provides mechanism to transfer business domain, application domain and engineering practice skills, eliminates silos of knowledge (key in larger organizations) etc.

"These guidelines are a starting point only: continuous improvement should be used to further tailor the agile variant to the exact circumstances."

Retrospectives, planned each iteration or when an event occurs that demands a retrospective be called, and a mindset of zero defects drives continuous improvement. Employee the XP engineering practices enables the team to keep the code healthy enabling new features to be readily added indefinitely. We treat deliverables from waterfall projects as constraints. To manage the constraints we request work from these teams well in advance and use engineering techniques like mocking to test the story cards that will integrate with these deliverables.

"These factors change when applied in an organisation with existing traditional (i.e. BDUF or waterfall) models, where agile teams must either coexist with or be adapted from teams using non-agile methods:"

We have agile teams that live in a waterfall world. We invite the waterfall projects to our release and iteration planning meetings (and retrospectives). The success we have and continue to have continue to bring new converts to the agile practices within the company.

"Process documentation with sign off and structured steps will help other teams track the project."

Disagree. The story card wall, iteration plan and release plan are all that is needed by those on the team or external to the team.

"Statistical indicators (like velocity) can help reassure non-agile teams that the process is under control."

Agree. Agile teams will make visible velocity and defect rates. Budgets will be within 1 or 2 percent and releases will be on schedule since they are time boxed.

"Fixed iterations will help co-ordination across teams."

Needed in highly integrated and large environments. Also helps the team build iteration and release plans based on velocity.

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Thanks for the detailed response Cam. The guidelines are aimed at the organisation, not the single team (I need to make that clearer) so for your situation (i.e. multiple teams) I think we agree on the coding standards. My point is that if you have a small company (for instance a start-up) you can be less strict with them. –  Keith May 24 '09 at 14:39
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We are a large company. We have taken agile from 0 teams 3 years ago to about 20 teams currently. One thing you can not lose with an agile team, regardless of size, is self directing teams. The leadership sets clear goals then trusts that the teams know best how to achieve the work. If the leadership does formal sign offs it violates the trust and slows things down. Remember, the automated test enforce the requirements. No process documentation can do better. Stage Gates (formal sign offs), as used in waterfall, results in blockers not the delivery of working software. –  Cam Wolff May 24 '09 at 21:58

A noble cause, best of luck. All good points above as well. I would only add:

Agile is about the principles, not the process.

See the Agile Manifesto.

Changing corporate behavior is the goal, not altering a proven process to "work with" a broken organization, so emphasize the principles behind each practice. And then don't change the practices. If the principles don't apply, then drop the practice(s) that reflect the principle. Changing the practice compromises the principle and defeats its purpose. The end result of such "adaptations" is most likely the same flawed process already being used, now wrapped in agile terminology but lacking the principles that make it work.

Process Documentation is Anti-Agile

"Process documentation with sign off and structured steps 
 will help other teams track the project"

I'd have to say a big fat NO to this. Documentation will take the agile right out of the process (not to mention the life and energy out of the developers). If you want to help other teams track the project, publish the iteration schedule and velocity on the intranet. Please do not waste the developers' time - and the customers' money - writing process documentation, especially for the alleged benefit of other people who are not stakeholders and have no risk.

And of course, no MBA candidate can escape a programmer thread without at least one Dilbert reference: Dilbert meets an MBA

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Thanks for the first point - I completely agree. The point of these guidelines are for applying agile in a new situation; if you already have something that works these are irrelevant. I'm kind of with you on the second point, but my experience of agile is all in my own teams - in lots of companies the developers in other teams are stakeholders. For instance you might have a BDUF team producing big server stuff while an agile team produces a web UI. –  Keith May 24 '09 at 12:23
    
I've cited the manifesto in my research - the problem is that while the authors of various brands are signatories (for instance Beck for XP, Schwaber for Scrum, Highsmith for ASD and Cockburn for Crystal) they all disagree on the actual practices. For instance Scrum has relatively large amounts of process documentation compared to XP, but both claim to be one-size-fits-all. –  Keith May 24 '09 at 14:50
    
@[Keith]: Scrum is a process-management method, not a development method. Scrum sort of assumes XP is also being used. When in doubt, return to the source - which is Beck. –  Steven A. Lowe May 24 '09 at 14:55
    
@[Keith]: per your example, the BDUF team is a customer (but not the only one) in that scenario so they should be included in the feature discussions and the planning game. They do not justfiy breaking the process to satisfy a documentation fetish ;-) –  Steven A. Lowe May 24 '09 at 14:57
    
@Steven A. Lowe - interesting points. I think the distinction between XP and Scrum (i.e. as relating to different parts of the overall agile) is a relatively new adaptation. Scrum originated in manufacturing (in a 1986 paper by Takeuchi & Nonaka) and evolved separately from XP (at least at first). My point about BDUF as stakeholders is that (as they are working to a specification doc) they are less likely to be satisfied with prototypes or incomplete functionality as an indication of progress. I'm not suggesting breaking the agile principals, just using a more 'heavyweight' variant. –  Keith May 24 '09 at 15:18
  1. "Process documentation should be minimal, real-time and current."

What do yo mean by "minimal"? Is it in the sense of say sum of the number of pages or in the sense of coverage (v.gr. standards doc, configuration management manual, design doc).

When you assume a project where there is no turnover in the team - and in long projects this is not a reasonable assumption, you need an efficient mechanism for knowledge transfer, and the most efficient mechanism for knowledge transfer is documentation.

I have seen projects where documentation is kept minimal (in the sense of number of pages) because it is too cumbersome to develop the documentation. But if you can re-use documentation from one project to another with no changes or minimal changes (and this is reasonable for documents like programming standards, configuration management manual) there is no documentation development burden.

Process documentation should cover all of the software development process or you will risk to have processes with steps that are executed in an inconsisten way. Agile teams have agile software processes. And by software development processes I mean clear mechanisms for managing code, controlling versions, controlling reviews, checking in code, fixing bugs, etc.

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I think I could do with more clarity there - I'm describing more than one thing: I've seen user stories that are basically 10 page specification documents and agile processes with sign off forms for every step. I'm recommending keeping both aspects down - user stories should be a paragraph or two and lots of process documentation appears to be unnecessary. I guess description of the process is kind of excessive too - useful for new starters no doubt, but I think doing takes precedence. For instance StyleCop checks on the committed code rather than a coding style guide on paper. –  Keith May 23 '09 at 15:52
    
Yes, there are projects where there is excessive process documentation. It depends on the complexity of what is being described. Complex processes with lots of rules need long documents. Have you ever tried to describe how to calculate a payroll for a manufacturing plant? (it's horrible!) –  Kwang Mark Eleven May 26 '09 at 20:23
  • Larger and more distributed or more flexible teams need stricter coding and testing standards, small teams can (and should) use less.

Continuous testing is invaluable regardless of team size. What should vary is the amount of testing based on project maturity and component criticality.

For new products periodic demonstrations are great for morale and are adequate for delivering progress feel to management.

For mature and shipping products at minimum periodic acceptance testing of major features will track a product's readiness for release.

For major system interfaces unit testing is illustrative and helps avoid surprises. When working with contracted sub-projects unit tests are better than documentation and critical to avoid finger-pointing delays.

Test-first development is a worthy experiment for the heavy lifting pieces of code. If your most valuable asset is your technology then it should be extremely thoroughly tested.

  • Detailed statistical control indicators are an unnecessary overhead: early release of incomplete software is a better indication of progress.

Statistical control indicators are vital to early identification of project overrun, but they are best left in the hands of the "Agile Coach" or "Scrum Master" either permanently or until the entire team becomes disciplined at producing accurate accounting of progress and delays.

When effectively applied, agile development practices should produce stories and tasks which are small enough that they are completed in hours to days. Effective management of the "planning game" and feedback resulting in individual task overrun can minimize the overhead of estimation and collecting progress data.

Finally, a historical record of customer (and/or management) decisions and an accounting of where time (days) was actually spent in reaction to these decisions will lead the way to improving both engineering and business process. A "swim lane" or "gantt" chart of blocked development and time spent will show how "but we're agile" is no excuse for rash business decisions.

  • Ideally developers should be close to the customer with no specialised intermediate roles. Additional roles should only be used if customers are specialised in a way that stops developers from also being users.

For once I agree! Separate dev and management meetings work well to separate concerns.

  • Iterations should be flexible unless it benefits coordination of releases with other departments or other processes.

Agile iterations are a valuable development rhythm for establishing a continuously releasable product. The ends of iterations are when feature decisions can be implemented and source control changes can be made to branch off features which won't make the target.

However this practice may be difficult for teams to implement when iterations to not meet up with business needs. Iterations should be scheduled around business needs like demos and promotions.

  • Developers should be able to easily and regularly communicate but meetings should be infrequent (monthly and weekly, rather than daily).

Monday / Thursday standup meetings are a great idea. However it needs a hard 15-30 minute cap. Split the meeting as needed to reduce the time. Separate concerns to avoid wasting developer time.

An office dog can help keep people attentive during meetings. A few barks is better than people nodding off or texting.

  • Pair programming should only be used for training and investigational tasks.

Pair programming, unit testing, merciless refactoring, and test driven practices are some of the most difficult agile skills for teams for adopt. The benefits of pair programming are to increase awareness and knowledge and prevent work from being done in isolation where bad decisions and assumptions can linger and cascade.

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I guess I need to be more clear on my first point - in a large team or lots of small teams you might have FxCop, StyleCop, 95% code coverage and mandatory code reviews all before any code can be committed. In a small team you might have style guidelines, 80% code coverage and code reviews for more complex features, all done when it's convenient - often after code has been committed. –  Keith May 24 '09 at 12:28
    
I could agree with that in naively agile projects. I see the objective as reducing the impact of small errors on head of tree development across a large number of committers so that they do not cascade into large errors. Larger projects and teams should attempt to split development into subprojects as soon as it is feasible. Making this transition too late is very costly. 1/2 –  Karl the Pagan May 25 '09 at 14:57
    
Small teams / immature projects could say "don't break the build" and medium size teams / deployed projects could say "don't break established tests" - of course there are good reasons to violate both rules temporarily. Code/branch coverage metrics not associated with risk metrics provide no benefit for their cost. 2/2 –  Karl the Pagan May 25 '09 at 14:58
  • Larger and more distributed or more flexible teams need stricter coding and testing standards, small teams can (and should) use less.

Coding and testing standards should exist regardless of the team size. They improve maintainability of the code, and make it easier to bring new resources up to speed.

  • Process documentation should be minimal, real-time and current.

Agreed.

  • Detailed statistical control indicators are an unnecessary overhead: early release of incomplete software is a better indication of progress.

There aren't many statistical control indicators for software development that are consistently valuable. I would be looking for variance to time and budget, defect rate in test and in production, and variance to estimates.

  • Ideally developers should be close to the customer with no specialised intermediate roles. Additional roles should only be used if customers are specialised in a way that stops developers from also being users.

So often this is impractical or impossible. Customers have so much to do in their own jobs that they rarely have the time to be extremely hands on with development staff. Business Analysts have the skills necessary to consolidate business questions and get clear answers much more time effectively. If your release cycles are short enough, customers will have plenty of opportunity for feedback.

  • Iterations should be flexible unless it benefits coordination of releases with other departments or other processes.

There should be some flexibility, but not much. One of the benefits of an agile approach is that it forces the team to limit scope to the most valuable requirements. Adding flexibility to iteration timing introduces increased risk of scope creep.

  • Developers should be able to easily and regularly communicate but meetings should be infrequent (monthly and weekly, rather than daily).

Daily meetings are effective with larger teams. They keep people on track and increase collaboration. They help prevent team members from getting stuck on a problem without asking for help. They also help maintain control around the iteration, which is very useful considering the lack of other controls available.

  • Pair programming should only be used for training and investigational tasks.

I don't have much to say about this one.

  • These guidelines are a starting point only: continuous improvement should be used to further tailor the agile variant to the exact circumstances.**

EXACTLY! Agile is meant to flex to the organization's needs. Constant tweaking is essential to perfecting the process.

Good luck to you on your thesis.

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