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The below snippets of code are part of an attempt at creating a function generateUpTo which generates a list pAllSorted which depends on nmax and thus rmax.

nmax = rmax `div` 10

pass = rmax `elem` mot
fail = rmax `notElem` mot

generateUpTo rmax = check rmax
where 
         check pass = pAllSorted
         check fail = error "insert multiple of 10!"

However, when attempting to compile, the compiler gives a "Not in scope" error about rmax in (what is here) line 1,3 and 4.

(How) can I leave rmax undefined until using the generateUpTo function?

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7  
To the person who keeps voting down Haskell beginner questions, It would be very helpful if you could you know, leave a comment as to why you're doing this. –  Phyx Jan 1 '12 at 16:49
1  
we will out-upvote him! :) more seriously, there has been a lot of abuse to SO of people asking "do my work for me" homework questions, maybe it was a mistake. –  gatoatigrado Jan 1 '12 at 22:41
1  
@Phyx Actually I try not to vote newbie questions down, but maybe I can explain downvoter. Much of these questions are what term 'too localized' is for and more generally are not interesting. –  Matvey Aksenov Jan 1 '12 at 23:40
1  
+1 this is actually a fantastic scoping question with a simple solution. –  Dan Burton Jan 1 '12 at 23:46
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you want to use rmax inside nmax, pass, and fail without passing it as an arguement, you'll need to include it in the where block of generateUpTo. Otherwise, it's literally, "not in scope". Example:

generateUpTo rmax = check rmax
    where 
         check pass = pAllSorted
         check fail = error "insert multiple of 10!"
         nmax = rmax `div` 10
         pass = rmax `elem` mot
         fail = rmax `notElem` mot

If you want these functions to be used in multiple places, you could just accect rmax as an arguement:

nmax rmax = rmax `div` 10
pass rmax = rmax `elem` mot
fail rmax = rmax `notElem` mot

Note - it looks like you also have some problems with your definition of check... the pass and fail value there are just arguements of check, and not the functions you've defined above.

Update

to use nmax (the outside-the-where-block scope version), you'll need to pass the value of rmax to it. Like so:

nmax rmax  -- function application in Haskell is accomplished with a space,
           -- not parens, as in some other languages.

Note, however, the name rmax in the definition of nmax is no longer significant. These functions are all exactly the same:

nmax rmax = rmax `div` 10
nmax a = a `div` 10
nmax x = x `div` 10

Likewise, you don't need to call it with a value named rmax.

nmax rmax
nmax 10    -- this is the same, assuming rmax is 10
nmax foo   -- this is the same, assuming foo has your 'rmax' value.
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If pAllsorted is defined somewhere else, and nmax is used in that definition, will nmax still be in scope if i use this method to fix the problem? –  Valentijn Pronk Jan 1 '12 at 16:47
    
in my second example... yes, that should work outside the where block. To call it you'll need to pass whatever the value of rmax is to it though. ex: nmax 10 or nmax myRmaxVal –  Adam Wagner Jan 1 '12 at 16:49
    
can you clarify on how to pass the value of rmax to it? –  Valentijn Pronk Jan 1 '12 at 16:53
    
I've added some update, hopefully clarifying this for you. If you haven't already, you may want to read an intro to Haskell. Here's one place to get a good start: learnyouahaskell.com/chapters –  Adam Wagner Jan 1 '12 at 17:00
    
I have already been reading that a bit, but thanks. pAllSorted is generated by a function that uses a list of n values. this list of n values is [1..nmax]. will this still work when using any of your suggested fixes? –  Valentijn Pronk Jan 1 '12 at 17:19
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Just put the definitions of nmax, pass and fail into the where clause of generateUpTo, just as you did with check.

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nmax rmax = rmax `div` 10

pass rmax = rmax `elem` mot
fail rmax = rmax `notElem` mot

generateUpTo rmax = check rmax
where 
     check pass = pAllSorted
     check fail = error "insert multiple of 10!"

The rmax is a function parameter it is undefined outside of the function in which it is declared. In this example rmax in the function nmax is completely unrelated to the rmax in generateUpTo.

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