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function extend(o, p) {
    for(prop in p) {                        
        o[prop] = p[prop];                  
    }
    return o;
}
function o() {};
function p(){};
p.name='caicai';
p.show=function(){ alert(this.name);};
p.show(); // output p
extend(o, p);
o.show(); // output o

why the "output" in here? why not to output 'caicai'.

function extend(o, p) {
    for(prop in p) {                        
        o[prop] = p[prop];                  
    }
    return o;
}
function o() {};
function p(){};
p.poo='caicai';
p.show=function(){ alert(this.poo);};
p.show(); // output 'caicai'
extend(o, p);
o.show(); // output 'caicai'

BUT in here ? why the "output" in here? why not to output 'caicai'.

share|improve this question
2  
Repeating sentences does not make your question more interesting. –  Felix Kling Jan 1 '12 at 18:10
    
Please use proper English when you ask your questions. Thanks. –  mc10 Jan 1 '12 at 18:11
    
English is obviously not his first language, but I think that's far from the biggest problem with this question. –  jprofitt Jan 1 '12 at 18:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First: This is not related to the extend function.

o and p are functions. Function.name [MDN] is a non-standard property and cannot be overridden.

Example:

> function foo() {}
  undefined
> foo.name
  "foo"
> foo.name = 'bar';  // assigning a new value
  "bar"
> foo.name           // does not work
  "foo"

If you'd declare o and p as objects, then it would work:

> var foo = {};
  undefined
> foo.name
  undefined
> foo.name = 'bar';
  "bar"
> foo.name
  "bar"
share|improve this answer
    
Yup, and I don't think it's available in all browsers anyway. Probably best not to use the reserved keyword and pick some other attr name instead. –  buley Jan 1 '12 at 18:14
1  
@editor: Exactly, it's not supported in IE. –  Felix Kling Jan 1 '12 at 18:15
    
all the browser should be?? or only firefox? –  caizZZz Jan 1 '12 at 18:18
    
@caizZZz: If you follow the link in my answer, you will find this sentence: "Functions created with the syntax new Function(...) or just Function(...) have their name property set to "anonymous" on Firefox and Safari, or to an empty string on Chrome and Opera. This property is not supported on Internet Explorer.". Which means that this property exists in Firefox, Safari, Chrome and Opera, but not in IE. Whether or not it is readonly in all the browsers, I don't know, but the fact that it is in Chrome already suggests not to use it. –  Felix Kling Jan 1 '12 at 18:19
    
@FelixKling:thx –  caizZZz Jan 1 '12 at 18:20

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