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But the thing is, there are exactly the amount of initializers in the char array that I declared.

char dash[9][9]={
        {"1","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9"},
        {"a","b","c","d","e","f","g","h","i"},
        {"q","w","e","r","t","y","u","i","o"},
        {"9","8","7","6","5","4","3","2","1"},
        {"i","h","g","f","e","d","c","b","a"},
        {"o","i","u","y","t","r","e","w","q"},
        {"z","x","y","w","v","u","t","s","r"},
        {"a","l","l","s","t","a","r","p","y"},
        {"m","o","n","d","o","l","o","r","i"}
    };

There are nine rows of nine columns. What's my problem? I checked other forums and this one for answers but found nothing that helped.

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7 Answers 7

You're initializing the array with strings, not chars, thus each element is trying to fit in the char and a null terminator. Try '1', '2', '3', etc.

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You need to change all your double-quotes "" to single quotes ''.

Otherwise, they are strings instead of chars.

In this case, a simple find-and-replace should do the trick.

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Use single quote instead:

char dash[9][9]={
    {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'},
    {'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i'},
    {'q','w','e','r','t','y','u','i','o'},
    {'9','8','7','6','5','4','3','2','1'},
    {'i','h','g','f','e','d','c','b','a'},
    {'o','i','u','y','t','r','e','w','q'},
    {'z','x','y','w','v','u','t','s','r'},
    {'a','l','l','s','t','a','r','p','y'},
    {'m','o','n','d','o','l','o','r','i'}
};
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If you use double quotes, it is done like this...

char dash[9][9] =
{
    "123456789",
    "abcdefghi",
    "qwertyuio",
    "987654321",
    "ihgfedcba",
    "oiuytrewq",
    "zxywvutsr",
    "allstarpy",
    "mondolori"
};

Otherwise, use single quotation marks. Note that you can get a warning such as

error: initializer-string for array of chars is too long [-fpermissive]

from G++ 4.6.2 (compiler options -Wall -Wextra).

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thank you Johnathon, i should not have tried to shortcut my answer. –  Gerald P. Wright Jan 1 '12 at 19:48
1  
C permits a char[9] array to be initialized with a string literal of length exactly 9; the resulting array is not null-terminated (i.e., it's not a string). C++ doesn't permit this, and a compiler other than G++ could well reject the code altogether. (Also, you need commas between the string literals; otherwise, you effectively have a single 81-character literal. I'll go ahead and add the commas.) –  Keith Thompson Jan 8 '12 at 11:54
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Change from strings (") to chars, Use single-quotes (') instead.

char dash[9][9]={
        {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'},
        {'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i'},
        {'q','w','e','r','t','y','u','i','o'},
        {'9','8','7','6','5','4','3','2','1'},
        {'i','h','g','f','e','d','c','b','a'},
        {'o','i','u','y','t','r','e','w','q'},
        {'z','x','y','w','v','u','t','s','r'},
        {'a','l','l','s','t','a','r','p','y'},
        {'m','o','n','d','o','l','o','r','i'}
    };
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Shouldn't you use single quotes ' instead of double quotes "?

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Change the char to char* and leave the double quotes. When you want to use it as character, cast it back as a character. This way you can have both characters and arrays of characters (strings).

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Interesting idea - change the declarator instead of the initializer. Surely though, you wouldn't cast anything when you wanted a char; you'd dereference the char * in the array: *dash[i][j] or even dash[i][j][0]? This solution would dramatically increase the storage required for the array, from 81 bytes to '81 pointers plus 81 strings of 2 bytes each' (either 6 or 10 times as much storage, depending on whether you have a 32-bit or 64-bit system). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 1 '12 at 20:32
    
Yes, I've only made that suggestion to show that there's another way of manipulating arrays. But of course, I do agree that there's an extra storage cost when introducing pointers. –  Nicolas Epaminonda Jan 1 '12 at 23:21
    
Casting a char* to a char will give you some implementation-defined value, likely the low-order byte of the memory address. How is that useful? –  Keith Thompson Jan 8 '12 at 11:51
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protected by Elenasys Dec 20 '13 at 17:39

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