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I have the following subroutine OutputingReorderedVectors, which aims to output vectors following some pre-specified requirements. However, the code just output blank files.

I think the problem should come from this following code segment, which involves re-order the key from the second-level hash of chainRollupDoc

  my @rollupArray = sort keys %chainRollupDoc;
  my @reorderedSS = ();
  foreach my $i(0 .. $#rollupArray)
    {
        foreach my $cui (sort keys %{$chainRollupDoc->{$rollupArray[$i]}})
          {
            push @reorderedSS, $cui;
          }
    } 

The whole subroutine is in the following

#####################################
 sub OutputingReorderedVectors
#####################################
{
  my $centroids = shift;
  my $fileName = shift;
  my $chainRollupDoc = shift;   
  my @rollupArray = sort keys %chainRollupDoc;
  my @reorderedSS = ();
  foreach my $i(0 .. $#rollupArray)
  {
    foreach my $cui (sort keys %{$chainRollupDoc->{$rollupArray[$i]}})
    {
      push @reorderedSS, $cui;
    }
  } 

  my %attributes = ();
  foreach my $category (keys %$centroids)
  {
    foreach my $cui (keys %{$centroids->{$category}})
    {
      $features{$cui} = 1;
    }
  }
  my @fullSpace = sort keys %attributes;
  open(OUTPUT, "> $fileName");

  foreach my $i(0 .. $#reorderedSS)
  {
    printf OUTPUT "\t%s", $reorderedSS[$i];
  }
  print OUTPUT "\n";
  foreach my $i (0 .. $#fullSpace)
  {
    printf OUTPUT "%s", $fullSpace[$i];
    foreach  my $j (0 .. $#reorderedSS)
    {
      printf OUTPUT "\t%f", $centroids->{$reorderedSS[$j]}->{$fullSpace[$i]};
    }
    print OUTPUT "\n";
  }
  close OUTPUT;
}
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2  
Do you use use strict; and use warnings;? I've only been programming in Perl about 20 years and I know I don't spot all the problems that they do, so I essentially never code Perl without them. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 1 '12 at 20:35
1  
Use array elements directly instead of using indexes. E.g. instead of for my $i (0 .. $#array) use for my $elem (@array) –  TLP Jan 1 '12 at 20:41
1  
use strict and use warnings until you know exactly why it is recommended to do so. –  Brad Gilbert Jan 1 '12 at 20:42
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't see where %chainRollupDoc is declared and that makes me wonder if you're mixing up a hash ref with an actual hash. It looks like the function gets called with a hashref as the third argument since you say:

my $chainRollupDoc = shift;

but the next line then uses a hash called %chainRollupDoc. Maybe you meant this?

my @rollupArray = sort keys %$chainRollupDoc;

(note the dollar sign added to deref the hashref).

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This is what I call OutputingReorderedVectors and pass chainRollupDoc OutputingReorderedVectors($centroid, $file1, $chainRollupDoc); –  user785099 Jan 1 '12 at 21:16
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Assuming where you have:

$features{$cui} = 1;

You meant:

$attributes{$cui} = 1;

This is the simplified version of your code:

use warnings; use strict;
use List::MoreUtils qw'uniq';
use autodie;

sub OutputingReorderedVectors{
  my($centroids,$fileName,$chainRollupDoc) = @_;

  my @reorderedSS;
  for my $i( sort keys %$chainRollupDoc ){
    push @reorderedSS, sort keys %{$chainRollupDoc->{$i}}
  }
  # NOTE: @reorderedSS is NOT sorted, only parts of it are.

  my @fullSpace;
  for my $category (values %$centroids){
    push @fullSpace, keys %$category
  }
  @fullSpace = sort uniq @fullSpace;

  open my $output, '>', $fileName;

  print {$output} join( "\t", '', @reorderedSS ), "\n";

  for my $i (@fullSpace){
    print {$output} $i;
    for my $j (@reorderedSS){
      # could possibly be replaced with a simple print statement
      printf {$output} "\t%f", $centroids->{$j}->{$i};
    }
    print {$output} "\n";
  }
  close $output;
}

If you gave us an example of your data, and the expected output of that data, we could help you further.

I would like to point out that you are programming in Perl as if it were C.

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